White House Undecided on China Censure at U.N

By Carter, Tom | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), March 19, 1999 | Go to article overview

White House Undecided on China Censure at U.N


Carter, Tom, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


The Clinton administration has not decided three days before the opening of the annual U.N. forum on human rights whether to sponsor or support a resolution criticizing China's record.

Such a resolution is sought by a broad range of human rights activists and has unanimous backing in both houses of Congress. But it could be expected to further complicate plummeting relations with China just weeks before a visit to Washington by Chinese Prime Minister Zhu Rongji.

Asked this week whether the United States would support a resolution, State Department spokesman James Foley said, "We've not made a decision yet in that regard in terms of how we're going to handle that issue."

The U.S. delegation, led by Nancy Rubin, leaves today for the U.N. Human Rights Commission, which opens Monday in Geneva and runs through April 30.

Whether to censure China will be a main U.S. concern, but the delegation will also work on other issues, including women's rights, Cuba, and religious persecution.

Mr. Foley said an array of problems in U.S.-Chinese relations had complicated the decision on human rights. He said North Korea, nuclear nonproliferation, whether to allow China into the World Trade Organization and "important commercial interests in China" were part of the equation.

P.J. Crowley, spokesman for the National Security Council, said yesterday the U.S. decision would be based on how best to get results.

"There is no question that we will speak out strongly on the issue of China's human rights in Geneva. The issue is, how do you ultimately change Chinese behavior."

The House and the Senate have both called in nonbinding resolutions for the Clinton administration to seek a human rights resolution on China. The Senate voted 99-0 in late February, and the House voted 421-0 acted on March 11.

At a separate hearing on the day of the House vote, Rep. Christopher H. Smith, New Jersey Republican, urged the Clinton administration to reconsider Mr. Zhu's visit to Washington set for early April.

He said the visit should not take place "while the rape of Tibet is going on. We cannot act as though it's business as usual."

There is a general expectation on Capitol Hill that the U.S.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

White House Undecided on China Censure at U.N
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.