Many Touched by Activist's Life

By Charry, Rebecca | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), March 11, 2000 | Go to article overview

Many Touched by Activist's Life


Charry, Rebecca, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Hundreds of D.C. residents, from notable politicians to quiet public housing tenants, packed Randall Memorial Baptist Church yesterday to say goodbye to Kimi O. Gray, a feisty, charismatic woman who drew national acclaim for her activism on behalf of public housing tenants.

During the last 25 years, Ms. Gray lobbied the powerful and organized the powerless to give public housing residents the right to own and manage the homes they lived in. She was perhaps best known for her work at the 464-unit Kenilworth-Parkside public housing complex in Northeast Washington, where residents formed one of the nation's first resident management corporations in public housing in 1981 and organized themselves to rout out an entrenched drug trade.

"She had the audacity to believe that public housing residents should be first-class citizens," said her close friend, former D.C. Mayor Marion S. Barry Jr. at the memorial service. "She had the audacity to believe they should run their own lives. . . . I can see her now, negotiating with God about some heavenly homes."

Ms. Gray, 55, died March 1.

The Rev. Willie F. Wilson of Union Temple Baptist Church in Anacostia gave the eulogy at an emotional service punctuated by shouts of religious fervor. The altar overflowed with flower arrangements from friends, including a large arrangement that spelled out "Kimi" in pink blossoms.

Ms. Gray's friends and associates remembered her as a big woman with a big heart who never took no for an answer. "She made herself a force in this city," said D.C. Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton, the District's congressional representative. "Nobody elected her to be a force; nobody appointed her to be a force. She just stepped up and said, `I don't see any of the rest of you all doing this work, so get out of my way, I'm in charge.' "

As president of the Kenilworth-Parkside Management Corp., Ms. Gray persuaded the federal government in 1990 to sell a public housing development to her group for $1.

Robert L. Woodson, a longtime ally and friend, said Ms. Gray didn't just challenge those in authority to change their thinking but also prodded her neighbors to change their own behavior. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Many Touched by Activist's Life
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.