A Privacy Wake-Up Call

By Baird, William Britton; Scott, Joni | The Humanist, March 2000 | Go to article overview

A Privacy Wake-Up Call


Baird, William Britton, Scott, Joni, The Humanist


On September 1, 1999, Newhouse News Service published part of the results of an annual University of Southern California study of more than 350,000 students entering colleges nationwide. It stated, "The percentage of young women who believe abortion should be legal has dropped every year for nine years ... from a high of 65.5 percent approval in 1989 to 49.5 percent in 1998."

Meanwhile, abstinence-only curricula is used in over one-third of all public school sex education classes. As the New York Times headlined this past December, "Abstinence Is Focus of U.S. Sex Education: Fewer Than Half of Schools Now Offer Birth Control Information." The article confirms that this "reflects a national political move that culminated in legislation in 1996 allocating nearly $440 million in state and federal money over five years for abstinence-only programs; Congress added $50 million in a separate bill this year."

Speaking of Congress, in a nonbinding vote taken on October 21, 1999, the U.S. Senate supported the U.S. Supreme Court's 1973 Roe v. Wade decision legalizing abortion--but only by a fifty-one to forty-seven margin. Then, in the same session but in a binding vote, the Senate approved by a sixty-three to thirty-five margin a bill that would have banned late-term abortions. Fortunately, this margin wasn't enough to overturn a presidential veto. But we aren't out of the woods yet. The Supreme Court has agreed to hear a Nebraska case on the same issue.

And speaking of the Supreme Court, due to retiring justices, major changes are likely to occur. President Clinton has said that, in the 2000 presidential election, "one of the things that will clearly be up for grabs is somewhere between two and four seats on the United States Supreme Court." A turnover of this magnitude could seriously alter the progress of civil liberties in the United States. And since all of the Republican presidential aspirants are anti-abortion, a Republican win could reverse decades of hard-won progress in the field of family planning.

Clearly, the religious persistence of the right wing has produced enormous conservative political gains that are now on the verge of rising over the levee. And an important part of that right wing is the National Right to Life Committee, the largest anti-abortion organization in the United States.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A Privacy Wake-Up Call
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.