Vatican and PLO Sign Agreement

The Christian Century, March 1, 2000 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Vatican and PLO Sign Agreement


The Vatican and the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) signed an historic agreement February 15 calling for freedom of worship in the Holy Land and condemning Israel's "unilateral decisions and actions" concerning its disputed capital of Jerusalem.

The agreement, which came little more than a month before Pope John Paul II's scheduled pilgrimage to the Holy Land March 20-26, is the first of its kind between the Vatican and an Arab or Islamic entity. "Unilateral decisions and actions altering the specific character and status of Jerusalem are morally and legally unacceptable," a key section of the agreement says in a clear reference to Israel.

At a 15-minute private audience after the signing ceremony, Yasir Arafat, president of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA), briefed Pope John Paul II on "the most recent developments in the peace process" and expressed "concern over the present situation," Vatican spokesman Joaquin Navarro-Valls reported. Israel's negotiations with both the Palestinians and Syria have been stalled by its renewed conflict with Hezbollah guerrillas in Lebanon.

Arafat said he urged John Paul to add Jericho, one of the first cities to be governed by the PNA, to the itinerary of his March pilgrimage to Jordan, Israel and the PNA-administered territory. Navarro-Valls said the pope "agreed on the spot." "God bless the Palestinian people," the Roman Catholic pontiff said at the end of the audience.

Zvi Tal, spokesman for Israel's diplomatic mission to the Holy See, expressed "dismay" at the agreement. He said that while the Vatican's position is well known, the signed accord amounted to interference in ongoing peace negotiations between Israel and the Palestinians.

The Basic Agreement between the Holy See and the Palestine Liberation Organization "regulates some questions of a juridical character concerning the presence and the activity of the Catholic Church in the territories of the Palestinian Authority," the Vatican spokesman said. In the 12 articles, the PLO affirms its "commitment to uphold and observe the human right to freedom of religion and conscience" and the Vatican its respect :'for the followers of other religions." The PLO also recognizes "the rights of the Catholic Church in economic, legal and fiscal matters."

The agreement is intended to serve as the basis for future accords with an independent Palestinian state. The Vatican and the PLO established official relations October 26, 1994, following the Vatican's recognition of Israel in December 1993.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Vatican and PLO Sign Agreement
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.