SURVEYS ARE GOOD AND BAD FOR YOU; Every Day Another Lifestyle Survey Comes out. and Every Day It Contradicts Another Survey That's Just Come out. So What Can We Believe? NICK BROWNLEE Presents a Survey of the Surveys and Concludes Only That It's Enough to Drive You Mad!

By Brownlee, Nick | The People (London, England), October 17, 1999 | Go to article overview

SURVEYS ARE GOOD AND BAD FOR YOU; Every Day Another Lifestyle Survey Comes out. and Every Day It Contradicts Another Survey That's Just Come out. So What Can We Believe? NICK BROWNLEE Presents a Survey of the Surveys and Concludes Only That It's Enough to Drive You Mad!


Brownlee, Nick, The People (London, England)


DRINK

Drinkers have more friends and stay healthier, while people who do not drink are more likely to have heart attacks, says a survey by the National Addiction Centre. And, according to Keele University, a pint of beer is a rich source of silicon, which can help the body fight disease. Danish doctors say regularly drinking wine increases by four times the success rate of surgery for a slipped disc.

BUT...the British Medical Association claims booze causes 30,000 premature deaths in the UK every year and is linked with 80 per cent of suicides, half of all murders and 70 per cent of domestic accidents.

LAUGHTER

Laughter lowers stress levels and boosts the immune system, according to a survey by the British Psychological Society.

BUT...people who laugh a lot are more likely to be rude, says the University of New South Wales. And a survey by Leiden University in Holland reveals a good belly laugh can be linked to a muscle weakness in the calf of the leg, leading to a medical condition called cataplexy - a sudden if only temporary paralysis brought on by severe shock.

ASPIRIN

A host of surveys state that aspirin will relieve headache and one a day can thin the blood and help reduce heart attacks.

BUT...too many aspirin can make your headache worse, according to the Consumers' Association Drug and Therapeutic Bulletin.

SEX

Heart expert Dr Steven Frankel's survey of over 1,000 men in Wales found the risk of death among men having sex twice a week was half that of men who made love infrequently.

BUT...the European Society of Cardiology insist men face twice the normal risk of a heart attack after making love, whether they have heart disease or not. And wild passionate sex - especially adultery - carries an even greater risk.

CLEANLINESS

Cleaning the house and washing the dishes prevents a condition called the Zeigarnik effect - defined as harmful nervous tension caused by an unfinished task - according to soap makers Fairy.

BUT...scientists at Bristol University found that children who have a bath every day are 25 per cent more likely to suffer from asthma than their grubbier friends because of the steam.

TELEVISION

TV programmes such as the Teletubbies stimulate toddlers to identify colour and movement, says a survey by British child care experts.

BUT...the American Academy of Paediatrics claim that watching the box deprives children under two years old of the stimulation they need for brain development.

TELEPHONES

Phone network Orange insist that two-thirds of people feel healthier after a good chinwag on the phone.

BUT...a study by psychologists at UMIST in Manchester revealed that mobile phones can affect marriages because workaholics use them to ring the office when they should be relaxing with their families. And, say microbiologists in Glasgow, public telephone receivers are infested with over 5,000 bacteria - more than twice as many as public toilet seats.

FILMS

Watching a film can stimulate the nerve processes and lead to an increased sense of well-being, according to a survey by the University of California.

BUT...the British Standards Institute claim some films can expose audiences to noise levels 35 per cent higher than recommended levels, leading to hearing problems.

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SURVEYS ARE GOOD AND BAD FOR YOU; Every Day Another Lifestyle Survey Comes out. and Every Day It Contradicts Another Survey That's Just Come out. So What Can We Believe? NICK BROWNLEE Presents a Survey of the Surveys and Concludes Only That It's Enough to Drive You Mad!
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