The American Dream. or Is It a Nightmare?; BOOK REVIEWS

Sunday Mercury (Birmingham, England), February 7, 1999 | Go to article overview

The American Dream. or Is It a Nightmare?; BOOK REVIEWS


LOVE it or hate it, America is the most powerful country on earth and what they do in Detroit or Des Moines has an effect on us all.

But it isn't just the almighty dollar that dominates the modern world. The United States also has the greatest propaganda machine of all time - Hollywood.

For close on a century the movies have been beaming an image into the minds of billions of people that is not so much reality as an idea of America.

This is the land of the pioneers of the Wild West and wide open spaces where a man's gotta do what a man's gotta do.

It is as gritty as John Wayne, as seductive as Marilyn Monroe and as homely as James Stewart with his "aw shucks" decency.

It's the America of conspicuous consumption where the middle classes have three cars in the drive outside their dream homes and the poor rarely get a look in. A country where even the outlaws and gangsters have a certain lyrical romanticism.

Above all, it is an America that is the land of the free and the rich, rich, rich!

No wonder millions of people around the world, enticed by Coca Cola, the Big Mac and Disneyland think of it as the promised land.

But exactly who are the real Americans and how does their self-image match up to reality?

Paul Johnson pithily reassesses the heroes and villains, the myths and the mighty achievements in A History of the American People (Weidenfeld & Nicolson pounds 25).

The only real Americans were the Indians who were rapidly driven to the brink of extinction and left clinging to the margins of their own land.

Modern America began with the Spanish, French and, of course, the Elizabethan English who brought back the potato and tobacco and dreams of a New World where anything was possible. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The American Dream. or Is It a Nightmare?; BOOK REVIEWS
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.