Opinion; the Diet of Lies That Makes Profits at Our Expense

Sunday Mail (Glasgow, Scotland), February 14, 1999 | Go to article overview

Opinion; the Diet of Lies That Makes Profits at Our Expense


BRITAIN'S entire population has been roped unwittingly into a gigantic experiment.

And the next generation could be the innocent victims.

For, as the Sunday Mail reports today, a scientist is now warning that "Frankenstein foods" could lead to birth defects.

On the quiet, food producers have tinkered with what we eat without so much as a by-your-leave.

The Government has just let them get on with it.

Those who claim to know what's best for us say genetically modified crops will mean cheaper, healthier food in the future.

Already, these products are virtually impossible to avoid. They are in 60 per cent of processed foods, including ready meals, baby food, biscuits and confectionery.

Maybe these new foods will be the answer to a hungry world's prayers.

And maybe they will turn out to be a Frankenstein's curse.

The fact is that nobody knows. Yet the Government seems to have made up its mind already.

And, in what is beginning to look like a re-run of the BSE scandal, it has brushed aside growing concern.

Ten years ago, any scientist who said mad cow disease could infect humans was ridiculed and howled down.

Now Dr Arpad Pusztai of the Rowett Institute in Aberdeen, has discovered the penalty of speaking out.

His research showed that rats fed with genetically modified potatoes suffered damage. And for telling what he believed to be the truth, he was forced into early retirement and gagged.

Now more than 20 scientists have backed his findings, and there is a growing clamour for stricter controls.

In opposition, Labour made a big song and dance about the need for a powerful, independent Food Standards Agency. …

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