Ministers Linked to Animal Rights Lobby; as Blair Pledges Fox-Hunting Ban We Reveal Labour's Astonishing Cash Ties

By Buckwell, Andrew | Sunday Mirror (London, England), July 18, 1999 | Go to article overview

Ministers Linked to Animal Rights Lobby; as Blair Pledges Fox-Hunting Ban We Reveal Labour's Astonishing Cash Ties


Buckwell, Andrew, Sunday Mirror (London, England)


TWO Government ministers have financial links with the anti-fox hunting lobby group which has given Labour more than pounds 1 million in election funds.

Our investigation has revealed that Angela Beveridge, sister of Sports Minister Tony Banks, is a pounds 30,000-a-year employee of the Political Animal Lobby, which gave Labour one of its biggest donations.

Until the last election Ms Beveridge was Banks's secretary while research in the MP's office was funded by PAL and the International Fund for Animal Welfare, both set up by millionaire Brian Davies.

Also, Fisheries and Countryside Minister Elliot Morley has enjoyed IFAW's hospitality on a trip to Prince Edward Island, Canada, and has received research assistance from PAL.

Our findings follow revelations that the animal rights organisation was threatening an anti-Labour publicity blitz if the Government did not act to ban fox hunting and Tony Blair's surprise announcement, on TV's Question Time, that hunting would be banned.

Our investigation has also revealed that Bank's wife Sally is on the board of directors of one of IFAW's sister charities.

Banks has also accepted trips abroad funded by IFAW, which included a fortnight cruise liner trip to the Antarctic.

Former IFAW company secretary Ian MacPhail, who introduced Banks to Brian Davies, said: "Two of Mr Banks's family work for IFAW and PAL which I think is entirely wrong."

Asked whether he thought it was a conflict of interest he said: "I was surprised to see it."

Banks is understood to have been instrumental in introducing Davies to Tony Blair.

Mr Blair met Davies, 65, at a dinner in 1996 which was also attended by Matthew Harding, the millionaire Chelsea boss who was also a close friend of Banks, 57. Harding died later in a helicopter crash.

Davies and Harding later said they were to give a staggering pounds 1 million each to the Labour party election coffers.

We have also revealed that IFAW funded two independent direct mailing leaflet campaigns which indirectly urged supporters to vote Labour.

The campaigns, which also including newspaper adverts, cost IFAW pounds 2 million and helped to encourage animal rights supporters to vote Labour.

The leaflets could not directly urge supporters to vote Labour because this would breach regulations on party expenditure during campaigns.

We have revealed Brian Davies made it his priority to win influence at the heart of Labour with success.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Ministers Linked to Animal Rights Lobby; as Blair Pledges Fox-Hunting Ban We Reveal Labour's Astonishing Cash Ties
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.