The Millennium Makers

By Lines, From Andy | The Mirror (London, England), January 6, 1999 | Go to article overview

The Millennium Makers


Lines, From Andy, The Mirror (London, England)


IT took four American authors two years to complete...a list of the 1,000 most important people of the last 1,000 years.

They used a complex 24,000-point system to judge each candidate's influence for the new book Ranking The Men And Women Who Shaped The Millennium. Here we print the top 100. Do you agree?

1. Johannes Gutenberg (1394-1468) Inventor of printing press.

2. Christopher Columbus (1451-1506) Agent of Western civilisation.

3. Martin Luther (1483-1546) Monk who created Protestant Church.

4. Galileo Galilei (1564-1642) His telescope helped found modern science.

5. William Shakespeare (1564-1616) Mirror of the millennium's soul.

6. Isaac Newton (1642-1727) Laws of motion helped propel Age of Reason.

7. Charles Darwin (1809-1882) Theory of evolution.

8. Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274) Proof God existed became cornerstone of faith.

9. Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) The ultimate Renaissance man.

10. Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827) Music's titan.

11. John Locke (1632-1704) Writings influenced US Declaration of Independence.

12. Mohandas K. Gandhi (1869-1948) Showed power of peaceful disobedience.

13. Michelangelo (1475-1564) First among artists.

14. Karl Marx (1818-1883) Founder of communism.

15. Sigmund Freud (1856-1939) Sage of the subconscious.

16. Napoleon I (1769-1821) God of war.

17. Albert Einstein (1879-1955) Theory of relativity supplanted Newton.

18. Nicholas Copernicus (1473-1543) Questioned if earth was centre of universe.

19. Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778) Spiritual father of just about everything.

20. Adolf Hitler (1889-1945) Villain of the millennium.

21. Adam Smith (1723-1790) Wealth of Nations is foundation of classic economics.

22. George Washington (1723-1799) Father of United States.

23, 24. Wilbur (1867-1912) and Orville Wright (1871-1948) Original Wright stuff.

25. Rene Descartes (1596-1650) Philosopher of truth.

26. Louis Pasteur (1822-1895) Theories on germ-borne diseases saved millions.

27. Peter the Great (1672-1725) Czar who built modern Russia.

28. Thomas Alva Edison (1847-1931) The man who lit the world.

29. William I (1028-1087) French lord conquered England in 1066.

30. Dante (1265-1321) Writing in Italian paved way for European literature.

31. Elizabeth I (1533-1603) Moulder of the modern British state.

32. Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865) Saviour of the American Union.

33. Johannes Kepler (1571-1630) Discoverer of the paths of the planets.

34. Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910) Superman of letters.

35. Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) Inspiration for three centuries of musicians.

36. Voltaire (1694-1778) Writings formed underpinnings of French Revolution.

37. Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882-1945) Protector of the American way of life.

38. Winston Churchill (1874-1965) Hero of Britain's finest hour.

39. Francis of Assisi (1181-1226) Immense contribution to spirituality.

40. Niccolo Machiavelli (1469-1527) The Prince is one of most influential books ever.

41. Lenin (1879-1924) Founded Russian communist party.

42. Ferdinand Magellan (1480-1521) Leader of the first trip around the world.

43. Genghis Khan (1167-1227) Destroyer of Asia.

44. Cervantes (1547-1616) Creator of the most beloved fool in literature.

45. Mary Wollstonecraft (1759-1797) Beacon for women's rights.

46. Rembrandt (1606-1669) Master of the Dutch masters.

47. William Harvey (1578-1657) Unlocked secrets of blood circulation.

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