The Thoughts of George Bush Jnr: It Was Us versus Them and It Was Clear Who Them Was. Today We're Not So Sure Who the They Are but We Know They're There

By Jones, Gary | The Mirror (London, England), February 5, 2000 | Go to article overview

The Thoughts of George Bush Jnr: It Was Us versus Them and It Was Clear Who Them Was. Today We're Not So Sure Who the They Are but We Know They're There


Jones, Gary, The Mirror (London, England)


US presidential hopeful George W. Bush has developed an alarming habit of talking gobbledygook.

Like his father, President George Bush, before him, the tongue-tied governor of Texas, has astonished on-lookers with his bewildering use of the English language.

He told one interviewer: "When I was coming up, it was a danger-ous world and you knew exactly who they were.

"It was us versus them and it was clear who them was. Today we are not so sure who the they are but we know they're there."

And Bush Jnr recently confused children celebrating "Perseverance Month" when he repeatedly referred to it as "Preservation Month".

Proving it was not just a slip of the tongue, he added: "I appreciate preservation. It's what you do when you run for president. You gotta preserve."

And those questioning the 53-year-old's grasp of grammar were hardly reassured when, describing himself as the "education governor", he recently told an audience: "Rarely is the question asked - IS our children learning?"

The front-runner in the Republican nomination race has also invented words such as "tacular", "mential", and "bariffs". …

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