Health Zone: Questions about Acne

The Mirror (London, England), January 20, 2000 | Go to article overview

Health Zone: Questions about Acne


SPOTS and wrinkles shouldn't go together. But outbreaks are something that seem to afflict us all, man or woman. Here, TABITHA STAPELY gives the lowdown on everything you need to know about adult acne.QUESTION 1. What is adult acne?

SPOTS. Dr Tony Chu, head of dermatology at Imperial College, London, says acne ranges from blackheads and whiteheads to pimples (surface spots) and deeper cysts which can leave scarring.

He explains: "Adult acne sounds like a serious condition that lasts for life, but it is caused by the same factors as teenage acne, it looks the same and it is just as curable."

QUESTION 2. What causes a spot?

PROF John Hawk, consultant dermatologist at St Thomas's Hospital, London, says: "Acne starts with a blockage of the sebaceous gland, often caused by dead skin cells clogging up pores.

"This prevents the discharge of oil so that it builds up, allowing bacteria to breed and inflame into a spot."

The bacteria are slightly acidic - causing itching.

QUESTION 3: Why do you get acne?

IT is partially genetic - if your parents suffered from acne, you are likely to develop it too. The next most recognised factors are stress and high levels of androgen, the male hormone responsible for oil secretions.

"Adult acne is common in businesswomen with stressful lives," says Dr Chu.

Most people can cope with the odd spot, but living with serious acne can have a devastating effect on self-confidence.

QUESTION 4: What are the myths about acne?

CHOCOHOLICS will be pleased to know there is no direct link between eating chocolate and spots. Prof Hawk says: "A bad diet may exacerbate acne, but it there is no proof that it causes it."

By the same token, drinking lots of water won't clear your skin.

Acne starts below the surface of the skin, so neither dirty skin nor obsessive cleansing has much effect on it.

QUESTION 5: How do you avoid spots?

IDENTIFY what your trigger is. If stress brings you out in a rash, learn about stress management. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Health Zone: Questions about Acne
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.