Outraged by Red Nose Ban

Birmingham Evening Mail (England), March 4, 1999 | Go to article overview
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Outraged by Red Nose Ban


I WAS disgusted with headmaster Jim Caffrey for banning his children from taking part in Red Nose Day.

What a silly bigot. His reason for the ban is because he does not agree with funds being used for contraception in the Third World. But why not? This is what Red Nose Day is all about, raising money to help those countries who are starving because there are too many people.

Ignorance certainly is not bliss in this case and the Third World have to be educated when it comes to contraception. What would Jim Caffrey prefer? A world so over-populated that we risk over-loading the planet?

Roman Catholics' beliefs are antiquated. How can contraception be termed as morally evil, as Mr Caffrey puts it.

I think it's morally evil for people to keep on reproducing and become an overpopulated race.

In China, you are classed as a social outcast if you have more than one child.

This should apply to the Third World.

Wake up Mr Caffrey, it's nearly the year 2000 and your beliefs went out with the ark.

Suzy Kendall, Sheldon

Appalled by comments

I was shocked and appalled to read Jim Caffrey's comments regarding Red Nose Day.

What a hypocrite he is for banning such a wonderful cause as Comic Relief. What gives him that right?

Comic Relief helps so many people in the Third World. He has no right at all, when you look back and see that people of his own religion have abused so many children in the past in their own children's homes.

Isn't it about time the likes of Mr Caffrey and the hierarchy of the Catholic Church came out and admitted their past mistakes.

B Shaw, Kings Heath

What it's about

I MUST express my outrage and concern at Jim Caffrey's decision not to allow the pupils of Rosary Roman Catholic School, Saltley, to take part in Red Nose Day.

It seems as if that is all the charity is about.

Does he realise that by controlling birth, unnecessary infantile deaths are lessened; by encouraging contraception, suffering and diseases are lessened.

What about the woman who get raped? What about the famine epidemics?

This is what Red Nose Day is about, amongst other things.

What ever personal views, which he has not divulged, are behind his stand, he should look at them in "detail" and separate them from the real issues of Red Nose Day and encourage the young generation, to do something for the world.

That is what love is about, that is what life is about!

And I am a Catholic.

Mrs C Gabbidon, Handsworth

Racists in all communities

S T VAUGHAN's letter (Feb 25) explains what many are undergoing regarding racism. Yet it always seems to appear that racism is only against black people and we all know this not true.

Why is it that when black/coloured people are attacked it comes over as racist, but not when it's vice versa?

The Stephen Lawrence case was terrible and those responsible should pay the penalty. The remark by one of Stephen's parents that no black young person was safe on our streets is also a two way thing as I know of white young people and the elderly mugged by blacks.

Racism is a terrible crime whatever colour. However I hate to think that being white means we are all racist.

I have many friends black and Asian and like to think they treat me as I treat them, with respect for who they are and not their colour.

M Evans, Sandwell

Crime against us all

THE case of Stephen Lawrence glares out at us through the newspapers and is reviewed in numerous television debates.

The spectre of racism has reared its ugly head from a position that was all too close to the surface.

Phrases such as "institutionalised racism" are born, resignations are called for and some are heard to exclaim with indignation that "enough is enough and that the matter should be put to rest.

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