Girls on Top Form; Radio Clyde Now Have an All-Women Sports Research Team. That's Not Due to a Deliberate Gender Policy but the Quality and Skills of the Trio Involved

Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), October 14, 1999 | Go to article overview

Girls on Top Form; Radio Clyde Now Have an All-Women Sports Research Team. That's Not Due to a Deliberate Gender Policy but the Quality and Skills of the Trio Involved


WOMEN are just as suited to sports as men. That's clear from the number of females presenting the reporting on a wide variety of sports programmes.

Radio Clyde nets a winner now that their entire sports research team is female. Names to listen for are Emma Louise Dodds, Heather Forrester and Jane Dougall.

Fearless rookie reporter Emma asked the question none of the experienced sports journalists dared to ask Rangers manager Dick Advocaat last season: "Have your players bottled out?"

Emma said: "He didn't know the phrased "bottled out" so I had to rephrase it and ask if they were buckling under the pressure of being at the top of the league."

While the senior journalist she was shadowing had visions of Advocaat pulling the plug on Radio Clyde for having the audacity to ask such a question, the manager replied: "That is a very good question. No one else has asked it, and the answer is no."

Emma added: "Ever since then, he's made a point of coming across and saying hello to me."

The 18-year-old found herself in the sports front line through writing to the radio station asking for work experience. It was to be Emma's gap year between leaving Lomond School in Helensburgh and starting university.

She was invited in for a day's work experience and asked back to work on a freelance basis. She said: "I'm now in my second year and happy to stay."

On Fridays, she routinely goes to a football ground to interview the manager and players. That material is used for the Saturday Scoreboard Programme. On Saturdays, she is the technical operator at the main game and is responsible for the setting up and running of all the outside broadcast equipment.

"It's heavy work but great experience," she says. On Sundays, she is studio-based "driving the desk" - meaning Emma, whose ambition is to get on air, is controlling the programme.

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