Lobe at First Sight; BRAIN CHEMISTRY THAT SHAPES YOUR SEX LIFE

By Carey, Tanith | The Mirror (London, England), March 26, 1999 | Go to article overview

Lobe at First Sight; BRAIN CHEMISTRY THAT SHAPES YOUR SEX LIFE


Carey, Tanith, The Mirror (London, England)


WHEN it comes to finding the perfect mate, it really is a matter of having the right chemistry.

Scientists have discovered that a reaction between two hormones in the brain determines whether we really have found the love of our life.

One of the hormones, oxytocin, determines when we fall in love while the other, vasopressin, manages our memory.

And if the two hormones are released at the same time, there is a better than average chance that we'll stay in love longer, according to Dr Thomas Insel of Emory University in America.

If the hormones are not linked, you are more likely to be unfaithful.

Dr Insel's research is just one of many new discoveries that are unlocking the secrets of the body's most mysterious organ.

A woman scientist at Albany University in New York recently discovered - somewhat to her embarrassment - that men really do have bigger brains than women. But Professor Dean Falk is quick to point out that size doesn't matter - and certainly doesn't mean that men are more intelligent.

Only the lower, more animal part of the male brain is better developed - probably dating back to prehistoric times when man was the hunter.

There is no difference between men and women in the size of other parts of the brain which control abstract thinking, judgement and reasoning.

Nevertheless, the discovery could go some way to explaining why men have the edge over women at sport.

They have held on to their ancient hunting skills to measure the speed and force it takes to catch and kill their prey.

And while Prof Falk was weighing and measuring the brains of 414 men and 390 women, two researchers in Australia have uncovered more evidence to support the belief that we only use 10 per cent of our brains. …

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Lobe at First Sight; BRAIN CHEMISTRY THAT SHAPES YOUR SEX LIFE
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