On the Go in His Golden Years: Even in Retirement, Nelson Mandela Finds Himself in the Thick of Things, from Burundi to Bill Gates's Jet

Newsweek, January 31, 2000 | Go to article overview

On the Go in His Golden Years: Even in Retirement, Nelson Mandela Finds Himself in the Thick of Things, from Burundi to Bill Gates's Jet


I would like to rest, and welcome the possibility of reveling in obscurity," Nelson Mandela told a farewell breakfast for the press in Pretoria last May. He said he was ready to spend his 80s amid "the valleys and the little hills" around his rural home village, Qunu. Mandela, soon to be the world's most revered ex-president, left the door to a statesman's role open a crack. He would serve, he said, if it was truly in the interest of world or regional peace. But he noted that negotiations he had just concluded to end the deadlock between Western powers and Libya over the 1988 Lockerbie bombing had taken seven years. "I don't want to reach 100 years," he said, "while I am still trying to bring about a solution to some complicated international issue."

He must have meant it at the time. But practically the moment his successor was inaugurated, Mandela plunged into a hyperactive nonretirement. Several times a month he takes South African CEOs on tours of poor rural areas--and then invites them to build a school or clinic on behalf of the Nelson Mandela Foundation. He has hosted a stream of visiting dignitaries. And he's slipped easily into the role of global statesman. The latest of his five foreign trips as ex-president took him to the United Nations last week. There he addressed a special Security Council session devoted to the 20-year-old ethnic clash in the tiny central African nation of Burundi--a monumentally bloody conflict that Mandela last month agreed to mediate. To be Nelson Mandela, it seems, is to apply a towering moral authority to an apparently hopeless cause.

He has had some practice. While still in office, Mandela was preoccupied with reconciling South Africans after four decades of bitter racial strife. Still, he took on a few overseas assignments. In addition to the Libya mediation, he pressured Indonesia's President Suharto in 1998 into letting him meet with the jailed leader of the East Timorese resistance, Xanana Gusmo. Mandela didn't always succeed. Nigerian dictator Sani Abacha ignored his plea for the life of dissident Ken Saro-Wiwa. And during the fall of Zaire's Mobutu Sese Seko, rebel leader Laurent Kabila spurned his mediation efforts. …

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