At Least Have the Decency to Admit You Got It Wrong

By Begg, Anne | Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), February 2, 1999 | Go to article overview

At Least Have the Decency to Admit You Got It Wrong


Begg, Anne, Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland)


AS a disabled person, while I was horrified by what Glenn Hoddle said, I was not entirely surprised.

I am still patted on the head by those who fail to grasp my abilities, only my disability.

They still talk over me to my assistant, as if I were a child. We call it the "Does she take sugar syndrome".

I have Gauchers Disease, a rare blood condition. Because it's a genetic condition, my parents felt enormous guilt as they could have passed it on.

But if Mr Glenn Hoddle is to be believed, they were not to blame at all - I was.

Or at least the person I used to be in my last life.

While I am not one to cast doubt on other people's beliefs, it is a very vindictive God who would punish for crimes of another existence.

Because, let's face it, if reincarnation does exist, none of us has any idea who we were in a previous life and what we did wrong.

And isn't the whole point of punishing someone to make them feel remorse for their crime?

The Christian concept of hell is frightening enough but Mr Hoddle's beliefs are 10 times worse.

I often point out that people who wear spectacles are coping with a handicap yet they have learned to live with it.

Does Mr Hoddle mean to suggest that people with poor eyesight have committed a minor crime in a previous life while others in a wheelchair are perpetrators of a much bigger sin?

If that's the case, I dread to think what I did.

His is a very medieval viewpoint, taking us back to the days when no one knew what to do with disabled people and they were institutionalised.

When someone is disabled, it is natural for them to want to blame someone.

Ultimately, however, we have to accept the cards we have been dealt - which is why Glenn Hoddle's comments stand to hurt those who have already been through much soul- searching. …

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At Least Have the Decency to Admit You Got It Wrong
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