Nuclear Blast from Douglas; Blair Urged to Foster Disarmament

By Hickman, Martin | The Birmingham Post (England), March 21, 2000 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Nuclear Blast from Douglas; Blair Urged to Foster Disarmament


Hickman, Martin, The Birmingham Post (England)


Britain should campaign for nuclear disarmament or risk rows between countries becoming a 'death warrant' for the world, film star Michael Douglas warned last night.

In a speech at Westminster, the Hollywood actor told MPs that three international treaties governing nuclear stockpiles risked 'coming apart.'

He suggested that Prime Minister Mr Tony Blair could show some 'leadership' and call global talks on the issue.

Making his appeal to the all-party Parliamentary Group for Non-proliferation and Global Security, Mr Douglas warned that the Cold War threat from nuclear weapons was still present. He said Russia and China had warned Washington's 'prospective adoption' of a 'Star Wars' missile defence system would cancel a missile treaty and could increase confrontation with the US.

Mr Douglas, a United Nations ambassador for nuclear disarmament, said: 'Three key arms control treaties are in danger of coming apart at a time when more material for making weapons of mass destruction is available worldwide than ever before.'

He said: 'The horrific prospect opens up a world of nuclear anarchy, where any feud between countries could degenerate into a death warrant for the entire planet.'

Mr Douglas said Britain was 'uniquely placed' to call for cuts in nuclear arsenals because of its special relationship with the US and Mr Tony Blair's personal reputation.

He urged the Prime Minister to speak at a conference on nuclear disarmament, the Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference, in New York in May.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Nuclear Blast from Douglas; Blair Urged to Foster Disarmament
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?