Museums Alert after Art Heist

By Keely, Alistair | The Birmingham Post (England), March 23, 1999 | Go to article overview

Museums Alert after Art Heist


Keely, Alistair, The Birmingham Post (England)


Museums across the country have been put on alert after professional thieves stole Japanese artwork from Birmingham's main gallery.

Two men and a woman raided cabinets at the city centre Museum and Art Gallery to seize the ornate wooden and ivory carvings which date from the 12th Century.

The theft follows a number of high-profile raids on the museum and prompted a fresh row last night over security.

Procedures were reviewed after previous thefts and museum officials have already launched an inquiry after the latest embarrassing breach.

The stolen items, known as Netsuke, form part of traditional Japanese dress and are worth up to a total of pounds 40,000. They have been part of the museum's collection for over 100 years.

The 20 pieces were taken from a glass cabinet in the gallery and police are studying security videos in an attempt to capture the thieves.

A spokeswoman for the museum said they were disappointed the display cabinets had been opened and a review of security had already taken place.

The cabinets, which are of an approved security standard for museums, are designed for visitors to examine objects closely.

A spokeswoman for West Midlands Police said they were treating the theft as an isolated incident and were not linking it with any other art raids across the country at this stage of the investigation.

Detectives are anxious to speak to two men and a woman who were seen behaving in a odd manner as they were leaving the building last Wednesday.

She said: "It is thought the three offenders forced a display cabinet with an unknown instrument and removed the figures before leaving the building."

It is believed the thieves were professionals who deliberately targeted certain pieces from the museum's collection.

Netsuke are highly decorative carved and wooden ivory toggles which form an important part of traditional male Japanese dress.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Museums Alert after Art Heist
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.