Hillary Breaks Her Silence to Prove She's Still Clinton's Trump Card

Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), September 11, 1998 | Go to article overview

Hillary Breaks Her Silence to Prove She's Still Clinton's Trump Card


Hillary Clinton bit the bullet last night and told the world: "I am proud of my husband."

The First Lady finally took her Stand By Your Man pose to the limit and joined her husband's battle against Starr and his Sexgate investigators.

Introducing him at a Democratic fund-raising party in Washington, Hillary turned in a barnstorming performance as she highlighted Clinton's achievements during his five and a half years in power.

She said: "I have personally seen how hard he has worked.

"How he has responded day in and day out. How he has faith that the American dream can mean what it should mean.

"Day after day I have seen his determination to do his best for Americans and the children who will inherit the country.

"I am very proud of the person I am privileged to be introducing.

"I am proud of his leadership, his commitment to the country, what he has achieved. I am proud to introduce my husband and our president, Bill Clinton."

Hillary has helped put on a united front before - when she held Bill's hand on TV and told the world she didn't care about his 12- year affair with cabaret singer Gennifer Flowers. Then when the Lewinsky scandal first broke she went on air again to say it was all a right-wing conspiracy.

White House officials hope a similar display of loyalty will do the trick again.

On holiday last month, Hillary looked aloof and didn't seem to be in forgiving mood. But she has her own political ambitions and helping to keep her husband in Washington may be to her advantage.

Hillary's dramatic speech came as Starr's 445-page report began to leak out.

Washington insiders say the report details Clinton's attempts to obstruct justice by talking Monica Lewinsky and his secretary Betty Currie through the evidence they were to give the investigators.

It also details a meeting between Clinton and his young lover while Hillary and their daughter Chelsea were away in Austria.

Earlier yesterday, Clinton was closeted in the White House with senators and Cabinet Ministers.

The words impeachment, resignation and disgrace were on everyone's lips. But Clinton - once dubbed the Comeback Kid - has two rays of hope on the bleak horizon.

Television polls yesterday morning showed that only 22 per cent of the American population want to see their president impeached.

And Clinton is well aware that his enemies do not want vice-president Al Gore to take over. They would prefer Clinton - who has been variously described in the past week as a Dead Man Walking and "national dirty joke" - to limp along until the 2000 election.

The Republicans, who already hold the Senate majority, would stand a far better chance of capturing the presidency if Clinton clings on.

Until now, Gore has been happy to stay in Clinton's shadow.

But if he was to prove himself an able replacement, the Republicans know he could pull off the millennium election and keep the Democrats in power. …

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