Clinton Faces His Biggest Crisis.Is It Saddam or Bill's Little Madam?

By O'hanlon, Terry | Sunday Mirror (London, England), January 18, 1998 | Go to article overview

Clinton Faces His Biggest Crisis.Is It Saddam or Bill's Little Madam?


O'hanlon, Terry, Sunday Mirror (London, England)


WITH warships and aircraft massing for a confrontation with Saddam Hussein, President Bill Clinton's spokesman was in solemn mood as he addressed the nation.

The top US aide carefully described on TV how the missile-like object was straight and did not bend to left or right.

But as the fate of thousands of British and American serviceman was being risked in a new confrontation with Iraq's leader the big issue was not aircraft carriers and missiles...but Bill Clinton's willy.

Last night a senior politician said: "It could only happen in America. We could be on the eve of another major conflict - and the biggest talking point is the President's private parts. It's ridiculous."

Yesterday Clinton, the Supreme Chief of all NATO and United Nations forces, should have been considering his Enemy No. 1 - Saddam. Instead the enemy was Paula Jones, 31, who claims Clinton made indecent suggestions to her and wants pounds 1.5million and an apology from him.

In a case that has made him a laughing stock among the strict Muslim countries of the Middle East, Clinton became the first sitting President in history to be forced to testify in a legal case against him.

Paula alleges that in 1991, when Clinton was Governor of Arkansas and she was a state employee, he invited her to a hotel room, exposed himself to her and asked that she perform oral sex. She claims to be able to identify "distinguishing characteristics" of Clinton's private parts - which could mean a bent penis.

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Clinton Faces His Biggest Crisis.Is It Saddam or Bill's Little Madam?
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