Head Rolls to Sound of a Crashing Symbol; Letters

The Birmingham Post (England), October 1, 1998 | Go to article overview

Head Rolls to Sound of a Crashing Symbol; Letters


Sir, - So having stated that our islands will not join in the first wave of states using the Euro, politicians like Julie Kirkbride (Post, Sept 25) now want to complain that national symbols will not be used on Euro notes.

Queen Elizabeth II does not feature on Scottish or Ulster notes and did not appear on Bank of England issues until 1960.

Incidentally, there was concern that the Monarch's face would be crumbled, or get dirty as the notes circulated at the time.

Non-EU areas that have our Monarch on their notes include Jersey and the Isle of Man. They seem to have no problem with having a woman of German descent on their currency.

The Euro notes look bright, exciting and futuristic in design but isn't the real importance to member states the value of currency?

While Little Englanders might want to hark on about the past, the opportunity to stop speculators, protect savings, avoid transaction rip offs and harmonise economies is the future.

STEVE KIRKHAM

Kings Heath,

Birmingham.

Safeguarding

British identity

Sir, - I was delighted to read Julie Kirkbride's Proud To Be British article (Post, Sept 25). Yes we do like our British identity but we do not want the break up of the United Kingdom and then on Saturday (Post, Sept 26) William Hague wrote Stop This Rus h to Europe. We must stop, look and listen and only join when the right time comes. So, Julie and William, keep telling us and I'm sure that the people who read The Birmingham Post will take notice. I am also very happy to hear that The Brmingham Post is going up in numbers - well done, it is a good read for all to enjoy.

MRS JANICE BOSWELL

Stoneybridge,

Belbroughton.

Report's delay

means more cost

Sir, - A response by the Probation Service to my letter (Post, Sept 16) concerning the effectiveness of Community Service in reducing crime was not unexpected, and I thank Mr Richard Green for the information given (Post, Sept 22).

Whether the tasks performed are sufficiently demanding to equate to the offences committed is, of course another matter. Even the Home Office Select Committee has expressed its doubts.

One can, however, well understand the beneficiaries' gratitude.

The West Midland Probation Service - one of 54 similar organisations - has some 450 officers with support staff and a budget of pounds 25million or more.

Dudley MBC contributes no less than pounds 700,000 each year to the service and no doubt other West Midland authorities do likewise.

Local taxpayers are entitled, therefore, to an assurance that the service is achieving its declared objectives.

Finally, it is readily recognised that the decision to require a pre-sentence report is the magistrates' alone.

It appears, however, that this procedure is now introduced with increasing frequency, resulting in delay in the conclusion of cases and incurring additional administrative costs to public funds.

B GREENFIELD

Coseley.

Public not

denied access

Sir, - T H Taylor (Post, Sept 24) is wrong. Committee meetings are open to the public. Most of the agenda is dealt with in public and people are welcome to attend. It is true that Labour have a tendency to put too many things on to the private agenda. Ho wever, the public are not denied access to the meetings.

One of my concerns under Labour's proposals for cabinet style government in Birmingham is that the public will have as much access to meetings of the Birmingham Council Cabinet as they do to the Labour Government's Cabinet meetings i.e. none.

COUN JOHN HEMMING

Leader,

Liberal Democrats,

Birmingham City Council.

Building bricks

of theatre tradition

Sir, - It was wonderful to read the full page of tributes to my late grandfather Philip Rodway (Post, Sept 26).

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