Talk About:Humans Should Vulunteer for Drug Research

Sunday Mercury (Birmingham, England), September 6, 1998 | Go to article overview

Talk About:Humans Should Vulunteer for Drug Research


IWRITE in response to the article on Dr Tom Flewett and his SIMR Animal Research Abolition Card (Sunday Mercury August 30).

We cannot put back the clock. Billions of animals have been sacrificed in the past, and medicines have been produced from their suffering. So those medicines should continue to be used in their honour or their lives and deaths were for nothing.

But from this time on, all animal experiments should cease and Tom Flewett could pioneer a really good cause.

He could offer himself up for Human Research against Illness. His new card would say just that, called the HRAI, and he could state he was prepared to be locked into steel vices, be tortured with or without anaesthetics and suffer poisoning, burning, ele ctric shocks, all in the name of Humans for Humans Research.

Isn't it clear that if 50,000 rats proved to be useless in finding a cure for arthritis, animals simply do not fit the bill.

And isn't the planet vastly overpopulated by the most evil creature on it - the human being? We are running out of both food and water yet we continue to try to keep humans alive no matter what.

So Dr Tom Flewett, Stephen Hawking, Andrew Blake and the rest of "I'm in favour of torturing animals" society - put your money where your mouth is and start the first Humans for Humans Research Group, climb into your tiny cage and wait to be experimented on.

You will not only bring a cure for your ills, you will save your soul - probably.

GWENDA STEPHENS

Redditch

Worcs

Animals part of life

IHAVE always been totally opposed to animal experiments - where have they really got us?

There are still forms of cancer that cannot be treated yet more and more animals face painful deaths in a vain search for a cure.

Cosmetic firms use hundreds of animals in tests to prove products are safe.

Tissue cultures could be used in most cases instead of an animal.

Animals were not put on this earth to be abused by man. They are an essential part of the wonder of life.

GRAHAM MILES

Alum Rock

Birmingham

A decision to make

IWONDER if Ursula Bates of Animal Aid would still be feeling so proud if she or her family needed emergency life-saving surgery.

She is lucky she has not had to make that kind of decision - no mother would let her children suffer for the sake of tests on animals.

Over the years I have had various operations, including open-heart surgery four times, and I am glad to be here to see my family, especially my three granddaughters, growing up.

MRS B. WALLINGTON

Kings Norton

Birmingham

My family comes first

INOTE with interest that Ursula Bates is proud to have two happy, healthy grown-up sons. She says that if her sons were still children she would let them suffer than be treated with anything developed using animal tests. How can she possibly know?

She is not in a position to know because she has not yet got grandchildren who might be unfortunate enough to need life-saving help which may have been developed using tests on animals.

I write this letter as a true animal lover who tries to get things in perspective. …

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