The Order of Service

Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), September 6, 1997 | Go to article overview

The Order of Service


Westminster Abbey has witnessed some of history's saddest moments ... but nothing compares to today's service.

Diana's funeral is unique.

The choice of hymns, poems and readings reflects her life.

From the moving poems read by Diana's sisters Lady Jane Fellowes and Lady Sarah McCorquodale, to her favourite hymn I Vow To Thee, My Country and a song sung by her friend pop star Elton John.

The service will last almost two hours and the Royal Family and Spencer family will be seated on opposite sides near the front of the Abbey.

Near them will be the members of the Diplomatic Corps, while other guests will fill the pews as they arrive.

The service will be conducted by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr George Carey, and the Dean of Westminster, Dr Wesley Carr.

Representatives from the Church of Scotland, Catholic Church and other faiths, including Judaism and Islam, have also been invited to the Abbey.

Members of Diana's charities will be taken to St Margaret's Hall, Westminster, where the service will be relayed to them.

The music for the ceremony has been carefully chosen by those who knew Diana best.

Lady Sarah chose the Adagio by Albinoni, Largo from the New World Symphony by Dvorak, Canon by Pachelbel and Nimrod from the Enigma Variations by Elgar.

Dr Carr invited Elton John to sing and his version of Candle in the Wind has been specially adapted to suit the occasion.

The choral work Song for Athene, a modern piece, has been chosen because it was written by the composer John Tavener as a tribute to a friend who died at a young age.

Princess Diana's mother Frances Shand Kydd chose the organ music to be played after the service, the Prelude in C Minor by Bach and Saint- Saens Maestro from Symphonie No. 3.

After the ceremony at Westminster Abbey, Diana's body will be taken to the Spencer family's private chapel in Great Brington, Northamptonshire.

The only people to see her interred will be her immediate family - Prince Charles and sons William and Harry.

During the procession of the cortege from Kensington Palace, the Tenor Bell is tolled every minute.

The service is sung by the Choir of Westminster Abbey, conducted by Martin Neary, Organist and Master of the Choristers. The organ is played by Martin Baker, Sub-Organist of Westminster Abbey.Music before the service, played by Stephen Le Prevost, Assistant Organist, Westminster Abbey ...

Second Movement (Grave) Organ Sonata, No.2: Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy (1809- 1847)

Prelude on the hymn tune Eventide: Hubert Parry (1848-1918)

Adagio in E: Frank Bridge (1879-1941)

Prelude on the hymn tune Rhosymedre: Ralph Vaughan Williams (1872-1958)

Choral Prelude: Ich ruf' zu dir, Herr Jesu Christ, BWV639: Johann Sebastian Bach (1685- 1750)

Elegy: George Thalben-Ball (1896-1988.

Martin Baker plays: Fantasia in C minor BWV537, Johann Sebastian Bach.

Adagio in G minor: Tomaso Giovanni Albinoni (1671-1751)

Slow movement, from the Ninth Symphony (From the New World): Antonin Dvorak (1841-1904)

Canon: Johann Pachelbel (1653-1706

Nimrod, Variation 9 arranged from Variations on an original theme (Enigma) Op.36: Edward Elgar (1857- 1934)

Prelude: William Harris (1883-1973)

THE members of the Spencer family will be received at the Great West Door of Westminster Abbey by the Dean of the Abbey, Dr Wesley Carr, and the congregation will stand as they are taken to their places in the North Lantern.

Visiting clergy then arrive and are taken to their places in the Sacrarium. Again the congregation stands.

Junior members of the Royal Family also enter by the Great West Door, are received by the Dean and go to their places in the South Lantern. Senior members of the Royal Family - The Queen, The Queen Mother and Prince Philip - arrive by car from BuckinghamPalace and enter through the Great West Door to be seated in the South Lantern.

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