A Path to Recover Patrimony

By Elton, Catherine | Americas (English Edition), January 2000 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

A Path to Recover Patrimony


Elton, Catherine, Americas (English Edition)


EACH YEAR THE contraband traffic of pre-Columbian artifacts and colonial-era religious art from Latin America moves hundreds of millions of dollars. Second only to drug trafficking in the Americas, this growing trade threatens to rob future generations of Latin Americans of their cultural patrimony and a piece of their identity. The search for ways to stem this trade led representatives from cultural institutes all over the world to meet in Cuzco, Peru, in late September for the conference "Combating the Traffic of Objects of Cultural Heritage."

"We are all doing solo dances; we need to create structures in which we can work together, that's why we are here," says Nelson Jofre of Interpors subregional office in Buenos Aires.

Illegal traffic in cultural objects has taken its toll on many other nations around the world. In countries like Bangladesh, Mall, and Samoa examples of traditional local folk art are difficult, if not impossible, to find, while they abound in Europe and the United States. This is what officials in Latin America would like to avoid. Over three days of presentations and workshops, conference participants exchanged stories and experiences, looking for ways in which they can collaborate and cooperate to fight this traffic. Some common obstacles were mentioned across the region. Many participants noted the lack of sufficient legislation and sanctions, or loophole-ridden legislation, for crimes against patrimony. But even in countries with laws and tough sanctions on the books, officials say, traffickers benefit from a culture of impunity, because they often hail from the elite social classes and have a certain level of access to and influence in government circles. In addition, unlike France and Italy, where there are specialized units for art and antiquities, law enforcement authorities in the region are on the whole poorly equipped to distinguish artifacts from replicas.

"It is easy to deal with drug trafficking, anyone can identify drags. It's a lot harder to work with artwork," comments Jean-Pierre Jouanny of Interpors Works of Art Unit in France. And of course underneath it all lies the common problem of poverty.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A Path to Recover Patrimony
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.