THE MAKING OF MARLENE; CARAGH McKAY SEES THE LEGEND OF DIETRICH COME TO LIFE. PICTURES BY ANDY McCARTNEY

By McKAY, Caragh | Sunday Mirror (London, England), March 30, 1997 | Go to article overview

THE MAKING OF MARLENE; CARAGH McKAY SEES THE LEGEND OF DIETRICH COME TO LIFE. PICTURES BY ANDY McCARTNEY


McKAY, Caragh, Sunday Mirror (London, England)


The arched eyebrows, the chiselled cheekbones, the husky voice and that unmistakable pout. As actress Sian Phillips slips into the persona of Marlene Dietrich to sing a snatch of Falling In Love Again, it's hard to believe you are not in the presence of Hollywood's most enigmatic legend.

A touring production of Marlene has been wowing theatre audiences around Britain and moves into London's West End next week.

Surprisingly, the Dietrich look for the play is re-created by Sian herself. She applies her own make-up with only the help of a wig master to put the famous blonde coiffure in place just before a performance begins.

Written by Pam Gems, Marlene is set backstage in a Paris theatre in the 1970s, when Dietrich was touring the world in a one-woman cabaret. "Marlene was very brave," says Sian. "She travelled alone, constantly having to live up to people's huge expectations of her. …

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