DEATH ON THE ARRIVALS BOARD; Town United in Grief as 16 Kids Lost

By Hall, Allan | The Mirror (London, England), July 19, 1996 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

DEATH ON THE ARRIVALS BOARD; Town United in Grief as 16 Kids Lost


Hall, Allan, The Mirror (London, England)


The stark horror of TWA Flight 800 was revealed in two simple words on the arrivals board - Annule, Cancelled.

Confusion then uncontrollable grief gripped relatives gathered at Paris's main airport to meet their loved ones as they were told the jet had crashed.

Among the victims were 16 bright American high school students on their first visit to France.

The pals had all been eagerly looking forward to their week-long trip to Paris to absorb the culture and brush up on their language skills. But they never got to see the beautiful city.

The snuffing out of their young lives, along with five adults accompanying them, brought home to a grieving America the utter waste of the disaster.

Dan Chandler, principal of the pupils' Montoursville High School in Pennsylvania, said yesterday: "It is going to take us quite a while to recover from this.

"They were all very bright students and this trip was going to make the French language and culture come alive for them. We are deeply saddened, utterly devastated."

School superintendent David Black called their deaths a "monumental tragedy" that ripped through the local community.

As stunned students gathered outside the school, Ryan Kane, 20, slowly paced up and down with a friend. He said his girlfriend, Jessica Aikey, 17, was among the pupils aboard the plane.

"She was really excited, she talked about it for months,'' Kane said, dark glasses shielding his eyes. Her last words to him? "She told me she loved me,'' he said.

Lisa Williams, 15, who knew many of the pupils who died, said: "This is a little community. When someone is killed it affects everybody.

"``We're a lot of good people here and I didn't think that we deserved it - no one does. Just knowing I'll never see them again is going to be the hardest part.''

And Heather Scarborough, 16, said one of her friends had voiced her fear of flying shortly before leaving.

Heather said: "Her last words were: 'I don't even want to go anymore, I'm too scared.' She called another one of the kids that was going and she said 'Will you sit by me, because I'm too scared. I don't want to be by myself.'"

The pupils, aged from 15 to 18, had left their school in a motorcade of cars several hours before the flight for the 120-mile journey to JFK Airport.

When the news began breaking on TV late on Wednesday night the town of 5,200 people had its collective heart torn out.

Candles were lit in windows at midnight and flowers began arriving at the high school - wreaths to express the sadness that has consumed not just Montoursville, but the entire United States.

"We have clergy here," said Mr Black, "and counsellors to help people deal with the grief and uncertainty.

"The community is very much devastated by this tragedy. Most of the students know each other."

The school organised a crisis centre overnight that was attended by family and friends of victims, and staffed by trained counsellors.

The five chaperones who were accompanying the pupils were a French teacher and her husband, a school secretary, a student's parent and a friend of one of the chaperones.

Father Stephen McGough, who comforted the families of the youngsters, said: "This is a small community where the school plays an integral part.

"We have lost our most precious things on this earth - the innocent children. They have been taken from us and the grief in this town is palpable.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

DEATH ON THE ARRIVALS BOARD; Town United in Grief as 16 Kids Lost
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.