Monday Books: Scots-Irish through the Centuries

By Kennedy, Billy | The News Letter (Belfast, Northern Ireland), April 10, 2000 | Go to article overview

Monday Books: Scots-Irish through the Centuries


Kennedy, Billy, The News Letter (Belfast, Northern Ireland)


Intertwined Roots : An Ulster-Scot Perspective by W. A. Hanna. Published by Columba Press, Dublin. pounds 7.99.

THE Scots-Irish diaspora in books usually finds expression more in the religious, cultural and social ethnicity of the hardy folk who moved from lowland Scotland to Ulster in the 17th century, and subsequently to the American frontier in the 18th century.

W. A. Hanna, in this work, devotes a large section of his book - six of the nine chapters to the conflict which the Scots-Irish population has been confronted with in the Troubles of the past 30 years.

And, while the narrative is a useful contribution to the subject of Scots-Irish influence on life in this Province, it must be compared with other publications by seasoned observers dealing directly with the political and security upheavals in the Province over the past three decades. A detailed historical work it certainly is not!

Hanna, a retired consultant surgeon and liberal unionist with leisure interests in history and geology, does refer to the early links with Scotland, and outlines a slimmed-down history of the Scots-Irish people since - in their natural homeland, in Ulster and in America. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Monday Books: Scots-Irish through the Centuries
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.