Inside the Beltway

By McCaslin, John | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 11, 2000 | Go to article overview

Inside the Beltway


McCaslin, John, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


CHICKEN AND VEGGIES

You might have read where chicken magnate Frank Perdue was hospitalized in serious condition last week after a traffic accident on Maryland's Eastern Shore, where Perdue Farms Inc. is headquartered.

Well, amid the stack of get-well cards the recovering 79-year-old Mr. Perdue opened, we're told, was one from Ingrid Newkirk, president of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals.

"I heard that you were in an accident," Miss Newkirk wrote. "I called [the hospital] last night and found that you had been released from intensive care. I hope you are not in pain and that you are healing well."

(You can guess where this card is going).

"Were you scared? Was the pain awful? Did you perhaps think, if only for a moment, how it must be for the millions of little life forms you have deliberately scared out of their minds, injured, and killed over the years?

"A chicken is like you in a lot of ways," she told Mr. Perdue, sending him - in lieu of flowers - a box of vegetarian patties.

CHURCH AND SOCIAL

It's the Rev. Daniel P. Coughlin's first public appearance since filling the suddenly controversial post of chaplain of the House of Representatives - the Republican National Committee this evening hosting a 5:30 Mass and reception for the Catholic priest at St. Peter's Church on Capitol Hill.

Pews, no doubt, will be filled with politicians - Republicans more than Democrats, ironically, given the recent rhetoric surrounding the appointment.

Father Coughlin is Congress' first-ever Catholic chaplain, named to the post only after Democrats spent weeks accusing Republicans of being anti-Catholic.

Among the well-wishers expected at Mass: Thomas P. Melady, ambassador to the Vatican under President Bush.

BEHOLD GOLDEN ARCHES

Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright was sporting another secretary's hat yesterday.

Participating in a World Resources Institute/National Defense University "Earth Day" event at Fort McNair, Mrs. Albright said too many people are using too much land, polluting too much water, consuming too much energy, emitting too many chemicals into the air, and crowding too many creatures into extinction, "a relentless trend that is both local and global."

"I have a farm over near the border with West Virginia," she said. "Not that long ago, the drive to it passed mostly trees and open land. Now, there are mostly malls, town homes and fast-food joints."

DIVOT REPLACEMENT?

In "celebration" of Earth Day 2000," bureaucrats at the Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response may undertake "at least one hour" of environmental volunteer service on Uncle Sam's dime. …

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