Quality Literature as a Springboard to Problem Solving

By Ducolon, Colin K. | Teaching Children Mathematics, March 2000 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Quality Literature as a Springboard to Problem Solving


Ducolon, Colin K., Teaching Children Mathematics


High-quality children's literature that is captivating for both students and teachers can be used to develop process skills and essential knowledge in children. The provocative power of a "good read" is limitless. Listening to or reading a good book allows all of us, young and old, to think, reason, solve problems, compare and contrast, critique, and communicate in both old and new ways. The educational potential of a well-executed children's story can change how teachers plan their curricula.

Creating Problems from Caps for Sale

In my twenty-five years of working with pre-service teachers and young children, I have never been disappointed in the power of high-quality stories to evoke enthusiasm and interest in both the college students and the children with whom they work. This past year, several of my college students and I decided to use a well-known book, Caps for Sale (Slobodkina 1987), with children ages five through eight as a springboard for mathematical problem solving. In this story, a peddler walks through neighborhood streets and country roads selling the gray, brown, blue, and red caps that are balanced on his head. When he stops for a rest, several clever monkeys steal his caps and the peddler must find a way to trick the monkeys to retrieve them.

We often act out the caps-for-sale story with preschool children. With children in primary grades, more complex problem-solving tasks are possible. Activities that involve ordering the four colors of caps and selling the caps for fifty cents suggest several problems requiring mathematical reasoning and problem solving. Our goal was to help children connect conceptual knowledge, or understanding how and why to do something, with procedural knowledge, or knowing the rules (Payne 1990).

As we planned problems for these young children to solve, we kept in mind the extensive work done by Kamii in explaining how children must "reinvent" procedures if they are to understand them fully (Kamii 1985). Both the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics's Standards (1989) and Vermont's Framework of Standards and Learning Opportunities (1996) emphasize the importance of problem-solving skills for children to truly understand mathematics.

We developed five levels of problems for students in kindergarten through third grade. The pre-service teachers knew that the problems they developed had the potential to challenge the thinking of five- through eight-year-olds, and they encouraged the students to invent their own approaches to solving these problems. For each class, the student teacher or I read the story to, and discussed it with, the students before presenting the problems, and all work was completed in a one-hour period. The examples selected for this article are representative of each class, although some children were unable to complete the problems presented to their classes. Student teachers were able to conduct follow-up sessions with all children in subsequent class meetings. We present these examples in order of complexity rather than by grade level.

Patterning Problems

For kindergartners, we began with a simple task of patterning the caps on the peddler's head. For simplicity's sake, we restricted our choices of hat colors to red, brown, and blue and did not use gray. Evan, a child in our campus lab school kindergarten class, was eager to place the red, brown, and blue caps on the peddler's head (see fig. 1). His vertical placement of the blue-red-brown pattern, although quite simplistic, became somewhat more complex when he added the letters b for blue, r for red, and br for brown. Evan used logical reasoning to continue the blue-red-brown pattern well beyond the hats that were on the page.

Many of the kindergartners could create patterns on their own. This task required them to notice similarities and differences and to use these observations to create a repeated design. Such a skill is important for many components of mathematical thinking.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Quality Literature as a Springboard to Problem Solving
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.