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By Swiercz, Paul M. | Human Resource Planning, December 1999 | Go to article overview

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Swiercz, Paul M., Human Resource Planning


Let it never be said The Human Resource Planning Society is afraid of innovation. In this issue of Human Resource Planning, we are showcasing our willingness to innovate by changing our format to better accommodate our strengths and your reported needs. Actually, the innovation isn't very radical, it's just interesting. Rather than the traditional three refereed articles, we have reduced the number to two in order to include a special extension of the Research Update section. In an article prepared by the 1999 HRPS State-of-the-Art & Practice (SOTA/P) research team, "What's Next? Key Findings from the 1999 State-of-the-Art & Practice Study," Patrick Wright, Lee Dyer and Mike Takla summarize the findings of their extensive research effort and provide practical advice for the immediate transformation of the SOTA/P findings into action. Their message--execute or be executed--is based upon their analysis and interpretation of interview data from a worldwide sample of 232 human resource and line executives, consul tants, and academics.

Consistent with our effort to provide the latest and most credible research on the development of strategic human resource management, the second article also addresses this topic. Prepared by Jim Walker and William Reif, "Human Resource Leaders: Capability Strengths and Gaps," takes a careful and critical look at HR leader development. Using self- and multi-rater assessment data provided by 490 human resource leaders and 2,463 other raters, the findings provide a unique and challenging perspective on the emergent role of human resource leader.

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