Competencies for Librarians Serving Young Adults

Teacher Librarian, April 2000 | Go to article overview

Competencies for Librarians Serving Young Adults


According to a recent Department of Education report, public high school enrollment is expected to increase by 13 percent between 1997 and 2007. This increase will have a great impact on all types of libraries that serve young adults, ages 12 through 18. The need for more librarians to serve young adults is obvious. All will feel the impact of the greater numbers in this client group in the years to come.

The Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA), a division of the American Library Association (ALA), has developed a set of competencies for librarians serving young adults. Individuals who demonstrate the knowledge and skills required b) the competencies will be able to pro vide quality service to teenagers during this next crucial decade.

Although these competencies were originally developed in 1981 to guide library educators who were involved in training librarians at the pre-service level, they have been found to be useful in a variety of other ways. Directors and trainers use them as a basis for staff development opportunities. They can also be used by school administrators an human resources directors to create evaluation instruments, determine staffing needs and develop job descriptions.

The audiences for the competencies include:

* Library Educators

* Graduate Students

* Young Adult Specialists

* Teacher-librarians

* Generalists in Public Libraries

* School Administrators

* Library Directors

* State and Regional Library Directors

* Human Resources Directors

AREA I: Leadership and Professionalism

The librarian will be able to:

1. Develop and demonstrate leadership skills in articulating a program of excellence for young adults.

2. Exhibit planning and evaluating skills in the development of a comprehensive program for young adults.

3. Develop and demonstrate a commitment to professionalism.

a. Adhere to the American Library Association Code of Ethics.

b. Demonstrate a non-judgmental attitude toward young adults.

c. Preserve confidentiality in interactions with young adults.

4. Plan for personal and professional growth and career development through active participation in professional associations and continuing education.

5. Develop and demonstrate a strong commitment to the right of young adults to have physical and intellectual access to information that is consistent with the American Library Association's Library Bill of Rights.

6. Demonstrate an understanding of and a respect for diversity in cultural and ethnic values.

7. Encourage young adults to become lifelong library users by helping them to discover what libraries have to offer and how to use libraries.

AREA II: Knowledge of Client Group

The librarian will be able to:

1. Apply factual and interpretative information on adolescent psychology, growth and development, sociology and popular culture in planning for materials, services and programs for young adults.

2. Apply knowledge of the reading process and of types of reading problems in the development of collections and programs for young adults.

3. Identify the special needs of discrete groups of young adults and design and implement programs and build collections appropriate to their needs.

AREA III: Communication

The librarian will be able to:

1. Demonstrate effective interpersonal relations with young adults, administrators and other professionals who work with young adults and the community at large by:

a. Using principles of group dynamics and group process.

b. Establishing regular channels of communication (both written and oral) with each group.

2. Apply principles of effective communication that reinforce positive behavior in young adults.

AREA IV: Administration

A. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Competencies for Librarians Serving Young Adults
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.