Indian Prairie High Schools to Debut Three Elective Courses This Fall

By Hart, Christie | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), February 5, 2000 | Go to article overview

Indian Prairie High Schools to Debut Three Elective Courses This Fall


Hart, Christie, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Most high school U.S. history courses will give students more detail about people, dates and places than a teen really wants to know.

Yet if they want to know how it all played out in real life, students have to wait until an English, art or music assignment happens to brush against something that sounds familiar from a history lesson.

A new course beginning in the fall at Neuqua Valley and Waubonsie Valley high schools will help students get a clearer picture of how history and culture are intertwined, educators say.

American Society, one of three courses debuting in the fall, is being designed to explore all the traditional areas of U.S. history and American literature in a less traditional way, said Kathleen Mulholland, assistant superintendent for curriculum.

"It's a different way to combine things for kids who think holistically," she said. "It will touch on the writing, the art, the music and the architecture of a period as they're studying it."

Sophomores and juniors who enroll in the course actually will be signing up for both a social studies and an English class that will meet in back-to-back periods. Students will receive credit for taking two yearlong courses.

Teachers from each discipline will team to coordinate assignments and develop projects that cross the usual boundaries of each subject. While the students will remain together for both periods, the teachers each will lead the course solo for an hour, Mulholland said.

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Indian Prairie High Schools to Debut Three Elective Courses This Fall
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