Look to Central Wisconsin for Value on Top Golf Courses

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), February 6, 2000 | Go to article overview

Look to Central Wisconsin for Value on Top Golf Courses


Fly to California's Monterey Peninsula and reserve a tee time at Pebble Beach Golf Links and you can expect to shell out greens fees of $305 per round (plus cart). Stay closer to home and play a round of golf at Kemper Lakes in Long Grove and you'll pay greens fees of $130 per person (including cart).

Who says golf isn't a rich person's sport? Why, the folks in Central Wisconsin say just that - and with good reason. At local high-caliber courses they have come to expect uncrowded fairways and budget-friendly greens fees ranging between $30 and $50.

For example, at Lake Arrowhead at Nekoosa, ranked by Golf Digest as one of the best golf values in America, golfers pay only $47 per round. At The Ridges in Wisconsin Rapids, greens fees run only $42 for an 18-hole course with challenging elevations and plenty of water and woods - white birch, green willows and towering pines. At RiverEdge at Marshfield, site of many state tournaments, you can play 18 holes for less than $30.

Lake Arrowhead, 42 miles north of Wisconsin Dells and only 13 miles south of Wisconsin Rapids, ranks among the top public golf courses in America and is one of only three Wisconsin clubs to earn the "great value" designation from Golf Digest, an award given to the top 100 courses nationwide in this category.

The Lake Arrowhead golf complex consists of two 18-hole courses: the Pines and the Lake. The Pines course, opened in the early 1980s and designed by well-known course architects Killian and Nugent, challenges the five-handicapper as well as the weekend golfer. It features a manicured par 72 layout combining bentgrass tees and fairways, velvet-like greens and strategically placed sand traps.

Carved out of Wisconsin's big timber country, the course has fairways flanked by lofty oaks and pines and includes five spectacular water holes. Whether or not you make your shot, there is always the scenic beauty of the North Woods surrounding you to make it all worthwhile.

For those interested in combining a little fishing with their golf, 300-acre Lake Arrowhead is stocked with bass, northern pike, walleye and panfish. During summer, the Shermalot Ski Team performs every Wednesday and Saturday evening at the Rome Lions Park.

One of the up-and-coming Central Wisconsin courses is The Ridges Golf Club at Wisconsin Rapids. Around since the mid-1960s, it has been reshaped and vastly improved by its present owners, brothers Dan and Todd Goska. Besides major course improvements, the Goskas added a lighted driving range and a new clubhouse.

Sit in that clubhouse restaurant and watch golfers tee off for the back nine with a shot that begins on an 80-foot-high ridge into a valley flanked by tall pines and a twisting creek. The redoubtable back nine is wooded and tight with several holes that bring a winding stream into play. Overall, you'll find the course deceptively challenging with a spaciousness that belies its tight fairways and the increasing density of trees that enclose the finishing holes. On Sundays $25 buys unlimited golf plus a cart after 1 p.m.

While in Wisconsin Rapids, take time to drive along The Cranberry Highway. The community, located in the geographic center of the state, sits in the heart of one of the nation's major cranberry-producing areas. Although many people visit during harvest in autumn, June brings pretty white-to-pale-pink cranberry blossoms. Blossoms resemble the head of a crane - hence, "crane berry."

As motorists travel the highway, they can stop for a cranberry shake or cranberry muffin or visit a cheese factory for (you guessed it) "cran-jack" cheese, studded with dried fruit. The route runs about 40 miles and includes visits to numerous marsh areas, historic sites, museums, markets, shops and restaurants. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Look to Central Wisconsin for Value on Top Golf Courses
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.