Awards & Prizes


Michael Goldman, author of Ibsen: The Dramaturgy of Fear, has won the George Jean Nathan Award for Dramatic Criticism for the 1998-99 season. A professor of English at Princeton University, Goldman received his first Nathan award in 1976 for The Actor's Freedom: Toward a Theory of Drama. Harry E. Shaw, the current chair of the Nathan award committee, commented, "Goldman's book is drama criticism of the very highest order." The Nathan award was established in 1958 to honor the best piece of dramatic criticism published during the theatrical year.

Sir Peter Hall, founder of the Royal Shakespeare Company, was the 1999 National Theatre Conference Person-of-the-Year. The honor was presented at a luncheon ceremony in December at the Player's Club in New York. Next fall, Sir Peter will direct Tantalus, a 15-hour epic written by John Barton, to be performed at the Denver Center Theatre Company. Also at the NTC ceremony, Hamish Linklater was presented the young artist award, and South Coast Repertory was recognized for its commitment to playwrights and its 75 premieres over its 36 seasons. Martin Benson, SCR's artistic director, accepted the outstanding achievement award on behalf of the California company and its cofounder and producing director, David Emmes.

The National Repertory Theatre Foundation, based in Hollywood, has named Eric C. Waldemar Jr.'s drama In Walks Mem'ry as its 1999 National Play Award winner, bestowing on the Washington, D.C. -- based playwright a $5,000 cash prize. Mary Fengar Gail's Drink Me, Maria Dean's One Shoe Untied, James D. Waedekin's Blue Plain and Javon Johnson's Hambone each won $500 as the runners-up. Johnson's Hambone, produced at Columbia College Chicago's New Studio Theater, was also presented the Theodore Ward Prize for African-American Playwriting. Currently enrolled in the M.F.A. program at the University of Pittsburgh, Johnson has also performed in many professional productions in and around Pittsburgh.

Victoria Nolan, managing director of the Yale Repertory Theatre and the Yale School of Drama, has received the Elizabeth L. Mahaffey Arts Administration Fellowship for the year 2000. The $2,500 fellowship was instituted in 1997 to recognize the work of one Connecticut arts administrator of exceptional accomplishment.

Coby Goss has been named winner of this year's M. Elizabeth Osborn Award for emerging playwrights by the American Theatre Critics Association. The $500 prize, presented at the Humana Festival for New American Plays at Actors Theatre of Louisville, recognizes his play Marked Tree, produced in 1999 by Seanachi Theatre of Chicago.

Oregon Shakespeare Festival resident costume designer Deborah M. …

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