U.S. View on EU Defense Plan Assessed

By Golino, Louis | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 14, 2000 | Go to article overview

U.S. View on EU Defense Plan Assessed


Golino, Louis, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


The Western European Union is releasing this week a report - "The United States and European Defense" - that examines U.S. reactions to the European Union's plan for a common security and defense policy.

It finds that Americans view this endeavor with a mixture of hopes and concerns. Stanley Sloan, author of the report, notes that the plan "has the potential to strengthen the Alliance if managed successfully, and the potential to destroy NATO if it is not."

The WEU is the only exclusively European security organization. It was created by the 1948 Brussels Treaty and is closely linked to both NATO and the European Union.

The latter's members seek to establish by 2003 autonomous defense decision-making structures and enhanced military capabilities, including military and civilian rapid-reaction forces. Some analysts doubt whether they will be able to achieve their goals within this time frame.

EU leaders say their planned forces are intended to complement, not replace, the NATO alliance. They are designed to give Europeans the ability to respond to crises in which the United States decides not to participate directly.

U.S. ATTITUDE: `YES, BUT'

Overall, the United States has had a "yes, but" perspective on the EU defense plan.

This approach welcomes European pledges to assume a greater share of the burden of trans-Atlantic defense, but cautions the Europeans not to do anything that would challenge the primacy of the NATO alliance, harm U.S. security interests or damage the trans-Atlantic relationship.

The top NATO military commander has always been a U.S. general, beginning with the first supreme allied commander - Europe, Dwight D. Eisenhower. The United States historically has borne the largest individual share of the military and financial burdens of the alliance. U.S. leadership was instrumental to the creation of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, and a continued U.S. commitment is viewed by American officials as key to the alliance's future viability.

Members of Congress, the report says, "have been even more forceful than the administration in warning the Europeans about the dangers of a divisive approach."

"The United States and European Defense" was commissioned by the WEU Institute for Security Studies, the WEU's think tank in Paris.

The author is a private international security policy consultant with more than 30 years' experience analyzing trans-Atlantic relations and U.S. foreign policy for the executive and legislative branches.

EUROPEANS AWAIT REACTION

The publication of this study suggests that European political and military leaders are keenly interested in how the United States views their defense efforts.

It is being released in advance of a WEU trans-Atlantic forum in Paris Wednesday and Thursday.

This meeting will bring together representatives of the 28 WEU members with U.S. experts and officials to discuss the European contribution to trans-Atlantic security and other security issues.

The WEU is in a state of transition. Some of its functions and constituent parts, including its think tank and Satellite Center, which interprets data from satellites for early warning of crises, are to be merged soon with the European Union.

The WEU's Article 5 mutual collective defense commitment, under which an attack against one member is an attack against all, is not expected to be integrated with the European Union.

NATO and the WEU have established mechanisms to enable WEU military leaders to command NATO missions and use military assets that Europeans lack.

At a Senate hearing in March, Clinton administration officials indicated that this arrangement will not be transferred automatically to the European Union when it partially absorbs the WEU. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

U.S. View on EU Defense Plan Assessed
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.