The Status of Library Automation at 2000

By Saffady, William | Library Technology Reports, January 2000 | Go to article overview

The Status of Library Automation at 2000


Saffady, William, Library Technology Reports


PART 1. CATALOGING

SOME IMPORTANT DEVELOPMENTS SINCE 1966

1966--MARC Pilot Project begins

1967--Ohio College Library Center formed as a regional processing center for academic libraries in Ohio

1968--Library of Congress begins distribution of machine-readable cataloging records

1970--Ohio College Library Center implements offline system for catalog card production

1971--Ohio College Library Center introduces online cataloging system

1971--University of Toronto Library Automation System (UTLAS) formed to extend automation initiatives begin by library's systems department

1972--Ohio College Library Center extends cataloging service to non-academic libraries in Ohio

1972--BALLOTS system becomes operational at Stanford

1973--Ohio College Library Center expands cataloging service to libraries outside of Ohio

1973--UTLAS introduces CATSS online cataloging system

1974--RLG formed

1974--MARC Applied Research founded; introduces MARCFICHE cataloging service

1976--BALLOTS cataloging service introduced to California libraries

1977--Ohio College Library Center changes name to OCLC Incorporated

1977--Washington Library Network (WLN) initiates online cataloging service for libraries in Pacific Northwest

1977--UTLAS becomes an ancillary enterprise of University of Toronto, separate from the library

1978--RLIN cataloging service initiated by RLG as outgrowth of BALLOTS

1979--OCLC signs first participating library outside of U.S.

1980--Informatics introduces MINI MARC turnkey cataloging system

1981--OCLC Incorporated changes name to Online Computer Library Center, but retains abbreviation

1981--OCLC Europe office established

1981--Auto-Graphics Interactive Library Exchange (AGILE II) system introduced

1982--Brodart introduces Interactive Access System

1983--Library of Congress replaces printed National Union Catalog with microfiche edition

1983--UTLAS incorporated as private company owned by University of Toronto

1983--OCLC establishes Enhance program as quality control initiative for contributed cataloging

1985--The Library Corporation introduces BiblioFile, first CD-ROM cataloging product

1985--UTLAS acquired by International Thomson Organization

1985--WLN becomes Western Library Network

1985--LSSI introduces videodisk implementation of MINI MARC turnkey cataloging system

1986--OCLC Asia-Pacific Services Office formed

1987--UTLAS introduces Japan CATSS implementation

1987--WLN introduces LaserCat CD-ROM cataloging product

1987--GRC International introduces LaserQuest CD-ROM cataloging product

1987--Gaylord introduces SuperCat CD-ROM cataloging product

1988--OCLC introduces CatCD cataloging product

1989--UTLAS introduces Chinese CATSS implementation

1990--WLN becomes private, not-for-profit corporation

1992--UTLAS introduces Korean CATSS implementation

1992--UTLAS acquired by ISM Information Systems Management Corporation

1992--Open DRA Net introduced on Internet

1995--OCLC Latin American and Caribbean Office established

1997--CATSS bibliographic utility acquired by Auto-Graphics; Impact/MARCit web-based cataloging service introduced by A-G Canada

1997--The Library Corporation introduces ITS.MARC web-based cataloging service

1999--OCLC acquires WLN

BACKGROUND

Cataloging is a mission-critical library operation. Reference, collection development, circulation, serials control, document delivery, resource sharing, and other library activities depend on informative, reliable descriptions of books, periodicals, and other library materials. Computerization of cataloging is consequently essential for successful automation of other library operations.

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