Management Boards for Hospitals

By Siddiqui, Abdul Ghani | Economic Review, September 1999 | Go to article overview

Management Boards for Hospitals


Siddiqui, Abdul Ghani, Economic Review


A NEWS item in daily 'Dawn' (June 12) mentioned that the government of Sindh has constituted management boards for Civil Hospital Karachi, Lyari General Hospital Karachi, Chandka Medical College, Larkana. The object of these boards is to improve the working condition of these hospitals. in view of the rising complaints from the public. This is definitely a step in the right direction, provided the government is sincere to improve the working conditions of the hospital.

If the government means business it has to do much more than induction of management board. With politicians as member/chairman this may prove counterproductive.

Besides most political parties have their youth wings in all the medical college of Sindh, particularly those in the public sector. The government is well aware of their activities and their negative role in education. Yet the government wants their god-fathers to play a role in the management of teaching hospitals. These gun-toting youths have indulged in acts that have derailed medical education. These include, Bhatta collection, self-granted leaves, taking away college buses for joy rides and for attending anniversaries of their leaders. These youth interfere with the examination result and are directly involved in copy culture and now in guess papers culture. They are given guess papers by the college teacher and the question must be from these guess papers, not a change of word is allowed.

Since the teaching hospitals are a part of the Medical College where the clinical training is given to future doctors and consultants it is the Medical Colleges for which the board should have been constituted. In our country the muck starts from the top. It is a well known fact that many of the Professors do not take their classes regularly (which is once a week) but delegate the task to their junior doctors. The Principal seems to be helpless. In some of the medical colleges of Sindh, late arrival of Professors (some times at noon) is common, they prefer private practice in the morning hour, avoid O.P.D.S and clinical teaching, manipulate examination results on Sifarish and Purchees and so on.

One honest, good, hardworking and God-fearing administrator can make a difference. Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Institute owes its present status to one person who became the Administrator in the Ayub era. In the same way Liaquat Medical College won laurels on the international level because of the one Colonel who was the long remembered as Principal of the College. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Management Boards for Hospitals
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.