National Building Museum Exhibit Examines Alternatives to Sprawl

Nation's Cities Weekly, May 8, 2000 | Go to article overview
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National Building Museum Exhibit Examines Alternatives to Sprawl


Exhibit Will Go On the Road, Too

The National Building Museum in Washington, D.C. has opened the third exhibition in a four-part series that examines alternatives to sprawl.

Reinvigorating Cities: Smart Growth and Choices for Change looks at how cities of various sizes are working to reestablish themselves as vital and inviting places to live, work and play.

Over the past half-century, urban decay has been the flip side of suburban growth. City life became synonymous with crime, poverty and disinvestment, and "urban" became a negative term. The positive qualities of a city--center of commerce, culture and entertainment; home to familiar neighborhoods; and magnet for energy and ideas--were lost or forgotten.

Certain efforts to stabilize and improve cities, like urban renewal, have been costly in terms of people, history and community.

Yet, cities have survived. While urban problems are still prevalent, a number of cities are moving toward a brighter future.

In these places, the positive qualities of cities are being reborn.

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National Building Museum Exhibit Examines Alternatives to Sprawl
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