What Is Left Leadership All about, Anyway?

By Bickerton, Geoff | Canadian Dimension, March 2000 | Go to article overview

What Is Left Leadership All about, Anyway?


Bickerton, Geoff, Canadian Dimension


This column is about Nancy Riche, Secretary-Treasurer of the Canadian Labour Congress.

Recently I attended an event that made me question why I have never examined the role this remarkable woman has played in the Canadian labour movement. The event was the official launch of the CLC Campaign for Workplace Gay Awareness. It made we think of the very many times I have seen Nancy Riche in action since the first time I met her on a bus to join a picket line of social-service workers in 1984.

Lately I have been doing a lot of thinking about the role of leadership in the labour movement and the role that the Left plays in the evaluation of that leadership. Anyone who has read this column knows that I have a healthy respect for most of the labour leaders and activists in this country. Most of them work enormously hard, sacrificing their health and private and family lives for the greater good of the working-class movement. Too often they are the subject of cheap and uninformed criticism from people who have never made the sacrifices and taken the chances that labour leaders take daily.

The best leaders are not necessarily those who get all of the media attention. I think the best leaders are those who work to raise the profile of others, who create space for others to put progressive struggles on the agenda. The best leaders are those who work to broaden and deepen the range of struggles that organized labour undertakes. The best leaders are those who understand that the measure of the labour movement is not to be found looking at the rate of return of labour sponsored investment funds but rather by looking at the number and diversity of our activists and the amount of support that the institutions within the movement are providing to these activists.

The labour leaders who are most building our movement are those who are prepared to take the political risks to ensure the full participation of those who have traditionally been marginalized and excluded, not only in society, but also in the labour movement.

That means women. That means gays and lesbians. That means people of colour, Aboriginal people and the disabled. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

What Is Left Leadership All about, Anyway?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.