The Digital Divide Network

By Anthony, Robert | Black Enterprise, June 2000 | Go to article overview

The Digital Divide Network


Anthony, Robert, Black Enterprise


IT professionals team up to create Internet-based clearinghouse

So what's all this talk about the "digital divide"--that invisible yet vast gulf between those with access to the Internet and cutting-edge technology and those without? Hardly a day goes by without a glowing news report about a new program, initiative or incentive aimed at helping the poor get their hands on computers or otherwise benefit from today's new technologies.

What happens, however, once you turn off your television or fold up your newspaper? Where exactly are these programs taking place? Who can you call? Where can you sign up to participate? This is where the Digital Divide Network (www.digitaldividenetwork.org) comes in.

Companies from across the computer hardware, software, telecommunications and Internet industries have come together to launch a national clearinghouse that provides information on what the private and public sectors are doing to bridge the digital divide. The Digital Divide Network was one of several directives put forth by President Bill Clinton during the summit on the digital divide held this past winter. "For the first time, America will have a one-stop shop for tracking our progress in every community, and for learning exactly what has worked and what has not," the President announced.

The Digital Divide Network is more than just a Website listing digital divide-related programs. It also serves as a focal point for discussions and the dissemination of new ideas on exactly how to close this technology gap, says Andy Carvin, senior associate at the Benton Foundation, based in Washington, D.C., which organized the project in conjunction with the National Urban League in New York and with other foundations and companies.

The Benton Foundation is an organization that seeks to shape the emerging communications environment and to demonstrate the value of communications for solving social problems. The National Urban League is well known for its civil rights initiatives.

"It's a real opportunity to level the playing field," says B. Keith Fulton, former director of technology policy and resources at the National Urban League. "It's an opportunity for those who are behind to catch up." Fulton recently joined America Online as executive director of corporate relations. AOL is the primary financial backer of the Digital Divide Network.

Carvin, who serves as editor of the Website, says that while it's always good to see new digital divide efforts get under way, it's frustrating to watch nonprofit groups waste their limited resources "reinventing the wheel," instead of making use of the knowledge already gained by similar groups. "They can't afford to make the same mistakes," he said.

One of the more useful parts of the Website is the "Find a Digital Divide Effort Near You" section, which features an interactive map of the United States and a directory of local digital divide-related programs and resources. By clicking on their respective states, users can access a list and contact information for technology centers in their areas. A number of nonprofit organizations and private sector companies, such as the NAACP and AT&T, have joined forces to build additional centers in targeted cities to provide computer training and Internet seminars to tech-starved communities.

Other areas in the digital clearinghouse include "Grants and Funding," a roster of grants, funding opportunities and non-monetary resources available to communities seeking technological assistance. The list is periodically updated. "In the News" is an archive of news articles and a listing of upcoming digital divide-related events and conferences. The section also features in-depth original reporting of breaking issues related to the digital divide.

Among those companies already making headlines is Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey-based DME Interactive Holdings Inc., which, on June 22,1999, became one of the first publicly traded African American-owned Internet companies.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Digital Divide Network
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.