This Is Your History Today

By Furtado, Peter | History Today, June 2000 | Go to article overview

This Is Your History Today


Furtado, Peter, History Today


THERE COMES A TIME in the affairs of men and magazines when we must review our journey through life, and give thanks for those who have been our constant companions. For us, just a few short months from the fiftieth anniversary in January 2001 of our very first issue, now is just such a time. Over the last forty-nine-and-a-half years, we have been more than fortunate in the support we have had from our loyal subscribers; and it is no exaggeration to say that barely a week passes without my receiving a letter from someone who has been reading History Today since the early 1950s.

Sad though it may be for an institution devoted to the past to have to admit it, our own records of subscribers in those early days are (to say the least) incomplete. As a result, we cannot say with any certainty just which of our thousands of subscribers have subscribed to the magazine since `History Today 1 (i)', unless they make themselves known to us. I should, though, greatly like to hear from those people, and there are three good reasons why.

We should very much like to extend an invitation to our fiftieth birthday party, to be held next January, to our lifelong subscribers; and when their subscriptions come up for renewal we would like to make them a present of the next twelve month's magazines for free.

In addition, we are intending to publish an anthology of `favourite' articles that have appeared on our pages over the years. Selection is a delightful but difficult task, with so many fascinating, innovative and sometimes quirky essays to choose from, written by so many distinguished hands, and with so many changes in the style, tone and content of history over the years. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

This Is Your History Today
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.