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The Elian Gonzalez Controversy - Now for the Propaganda

The World and I, July 2000 | Go to article overview

The Elian Gonzalez Controversy - Now for the Propaganda


UNITED STATES--We have all seen the pictures. The notorious image of raw terror in a child and a fisherman at gunpoint, captured on film by a bold and lucky AP photographer while his hapless NBC counterpart, kicked and Maced by federal agents, languished on the floor. Then there is Happy Elian, those all-smiles snapshots that seem to come to us periodically "courtesy Greg Craig," the lawyer President Clinton and Elian's father, Juan Miguel Gonzalez, share. Before Americans can reconcile these two polar images, there are countless questions that must be answered. ... Does the end justify the means? ... Who speaks for Elian Gonzalez? ... Who speaks for Juan Miguel Gonzalez? ... Did the U.S. government even want a peaceful solution? ... Why is the media so supinely content to let this story be managed by the government, courtesy of Greg Craig. It makes you wonder whatever happened to that old New Left mantra, "Question Authority."

--Washington Times

April 25, 2000

Elian gonzalez needs his dad now

UNITED STATES--Elian Gonzalez belongs with his father. Family law and family values say so. With negotiations bogged down, Attorney General Janet Reno's decision to remove the boy from the home of his Miami relatives was the correct one.

Mental health experts had warned the Justice Department that the boy's goldfish-bowl existence amid distant relatives and demonstrators, brainwashing him to fear his father, was abusive. Unexpected though it was during the Easter weekend, the swift action by U.S. agents under the cover of darkness, ends for now the circus-like atmosphere that had engulfed the child.

--Baltimore Sun

April 23, 2000

Raid based on tissue of lies

UNITED STATES--Bill Clinton and Janet Reno have been insisting that the armed assault on Lazaro Gonzalez' house was necessary to uphold the "rule of law." Who are they trying to kid? Presumably not the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals, which enjoined the government from moving Elian Gonzalez outside the jurisdiction of U.S. courts--specifically to the Cuban diplomatic mission in Washington. ...

The Elian Gonzalez case is a custody dispute. In Florida, as in all states, custody disputes are addressed by state family courts, not federal courts, and focus on one paramount issue: What are the best interests of the child--not the interests of a parent, not the interests of a president, not the interests of a foreign government. Has there ever been a case of a child's custody being changed by the force of the federal government without a specific court order authorizing it?

--Andrew P. Napolitano

Wall Street Journal

April 26, 2000

Father's love, child's rights

UNITED STATES--The federal raid to rescue Elian Gonzalez was an unfortunate but necessary action to show where the United States stands on the supreme social importance of nurturing parental love. ... A parent-child relationship is paramount. It's a reflection of spiritually based love everyone has a right to. Laws are written to support a social consensus that this primal bond not be broken. In Elian's case, if father and son had not been reunited, any U.S. parent might have had cause to fear the government could take a child.

It's especially worrisome that Vice President Al Gore, who may be the next president, thought there was a choice about where Elian should go even after his own government found the father to be a loving parent. Fortunately, his boss thought otherwise.

--Christian Science Monitor

April 24, 2000

Public image crisis

ARGENTINA--The true wave of dislike toward Elian's relatives substantially increased when the famous video was shown with the boy saying, "Dad, I'm not going to Cuba." That image made it clear that the boy was being manipulated for political purposes. From the start, it was a bad idea to mix Elian with politics.

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