Bits of Inspiration for Teachers and Administrators

By Ediger, Marlow | College Student Journal, March 2000 | Go to article overview

Bits of Inspiration for Teachers and Administrators


Ediger, Marlow, College Student Journal


Who does not like to feel inspired to achieve and develop more optimally? Writers of wisdom can motivate and encourage. Adversities occur and these need to be conquered through problem solving and perseverance, to the best possible. Opportunities in life come and go to reach upward and be of service to others. Each person needs to avail himself/herself of chances to be a member of society with a feeling of belonging as well as to have recognition needs met. Individuals desire to be known for positive achievements in education and in the societal arena.

At teachers meetings and in selected journal articles, inspirational talks are in evidence. I believe these inspirational messages should be passed on more frequently. They may improve morale, be refreshing, and provide a needed change from the hustle, bustle, and work of classrooms and teaching. I have collected three messages of inspiration which provide feelings of relaxation and contentment.

Words of Wisdom

As an external Examiner for Baroda University involving students working for the PhD degree in Education, I read the following quote written by Henry Van Dyke from the thesis completed by C. Ratna Papa (1997):

First:

And what is teaching? Ah! There you have the worst paid and the best rewarded of all vocations. Dare not enter it unless you love it. For the vast majority of men for whom it has no promise of wealth or fame but they to whom it is dear for its own sake are among the nobility of mankind. I sing the praise of the unknown teacher, king of himself and leader of mankind!

   [Note on the author. Henry Van Dyke (1852-1933) was an American clergyman,
   educator, novelist, essayist, poet, and religious writer He wrote the
   Companionable Books, The Poetry of Tennyson, The Story of the Other Wise
   Man, Fisherman's Luck, and The Blue Flower, among others. He served as
   United States minister to the Netherlands and Luxembourg from 1913- 1916
   (The World Book Encyclopedia, 1972).]

Second:

Blessed are you teachers: For you have found your work.

Blessed are you teachers: For you are freed from the temptation to put your trust in money.

Blessed are you teachers. For yours is the kingdom of children.

Blessed are you teachers: For your associates are among the world's best.

Blessed are you teachers: For your work is constantly realizing your selfhood,

Blessed are you teachers: For you may `allure to brighter worlds' of truth and live and learn the way.

Blessed are you teachers: For you have kinship with the great sharing souls of all mankind.

Blessed are you teachers: For you have an Elder Brother who is the Great Teacher, even of the whole world (Herman Harrel Horne, 1931).

   [Note on the Author. Dr. Herman Harrel Horne (1874-1946) was an educational
   philosopher; his last position was at New York University. … 

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