All Things Korean; Impact of Economic Globalization

Korea Times (Seoul, Korea), May 14, 2000 | Go to article overview

All Things Korean; Impact of Economic Globalization


The nation has been deluged by the plethora of the three ``R'' problems _ rationalization, restructuring and retrenchments, a sort of byproduct of reforming society's abnormalities from our past. We, as a nation, have come to realize the enormous costs and sacrifices needed to solve these problems. Our own home grown problems have created social, economic and regional disparities from our heyday of the 80's, and the dividing lines among these unparalleled social paradigms are worsening, creating what Professor Bob Gregory of Australian National University termed as ``two nations,'' those with jobs and those without jobs.

Gregory's research into the Australian economy revealed that the proportion of one-parent families increased from 13 to 22 percent since 1979 and some 60 percents of all work-poor families are one-parent families with dependents. The research highlights the division between the work-rich and the work-poor, containing a geographical contrast and polarization. The survey's finding on the geographical polarization of poor and jobless families is of significance to policy making in the Korean economy.

Traditionally, most job seekers converged on major cities such as Seoul and Pusan, leaving insufficient labor forces in the rural agricultural areas in Korea. Agricultural producers and rice farmers in Korea became a class of``work-poor'' families, and their income status is riskier now more than ever due to economic globalization, which can be viewed as an ``ethical and moral menace.''

Professor Timothy Gorringe in his book of ``Fair Shares: Ethics and the Global Economy,'' describes that ``globalization has the potential for destroying society.'' Professor Dani Rodrik writes in the book of ``Making Openness Work,'' that ``it requires too much blind faith in markets to believe that the global allocation of resources is enhanced by the twentysomething-year-olds in London who move hundreds of millions of dollars around the globe in a matter of an instant.''

Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak also said in his speech that ``there is a sense that there must be something wrong with a system that wipes out years of hard-won development because of changes in market sentiment. Years of progress are gone, because of developments elsewhere.'' All these fears and apprehensions of fully blasted globalization are indeed intimidating to the ordinary work-poor and jobless classes in our society.

Polarization of regions, industries and the unemployed from the impact of economic rationalism encountered by the Western world are looming in the traditionally cohesive and closely networked country such as Korea. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

All Things Korean; Impact of Economic Globalization
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.