Picture of the Week

The Birmingham Post (England), June 24, 2000 | Go to article overview

Picture of the Week


Paternal Love (c1775). By Etienne Aubry (1745-81). Barber Institute of Fine Arts, Birmingham University.

The idea that fathers should invest time and emotion in their young families may be topical, but it is by no means new.

It was certainly current in Enlightenment France, where the writer and philosopher Diderot heaped praise on this painting when it was exhibited at the Paris Salon in 1775.

The picture, which is possibly the short-lived Aubry's masterpiece, was lent to the Salon by his patron, the Comte d'Angiviller, director of Royal Buildings to King Louis XVI.

The painting shows three generations of a family in their spartan home, with such domestic details as the cat asleep on the mantelpiece. The proud father reaches to embrace his small son while an older man, presumably the children's grandfather, looks on.

As in the paintings of Sir David Wilkie, Aubry's positive presentation of the virtues of the poor but respectable class seems to lay down a formula which became more familiar - and hackneyed - in Victorian painting.

This painting is one of seven from public collections around the country which has recently been chosen for this year's Woodmansterne Art Conservation Award. The scheme, launched in 1995 to assist conservation of works in public galleries, is funded by sales of Woodmansterne fine art greetings cards.

Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery 0121 303 2834: Connecting Threads. Ambitious survey of textiles and costumes from the museum's collections, spanning different centuries and cultures. Ends tomorrow (also incorporating displays at Soho House, Aston Hall, Sarehole Mill and Museum of the Jewellery Quarter until Sep 17). Four Recent Print Donations. New additions to the print collection featuring A S Hartrick, Robert Gaudy, William Gear and Michael Rothenstein. Until Aug 6 (Mon-Thu/Sat 10am-5pm, Sun 12.30pm-5pm). Gas Hall: Kingdom of the Soul: German Symbolist Art 1870-1920. The only showing in Britain of a major international exhibition, also showing in Frankfurt and Stockholm, devoted to a period of German art little known here. This is turn-of-the-century Symbolism with a German accent with highly romantic, sometimes morbid, and often erotic images from artists ranging from Arnold Bocklin and Franz von Stuck to the little known Hans Thoma, Ludwig Van Hoffmann and Hans von Marees. Until July 30 (Mon-Thu/Sat 10am-5pm, Sun 12.30pm-5pm. Admission pounds 5 (pounds 3.50) family pounds 14).

Ikon Gallery, Brindleyplace 0121 248 0708: Richard Billingham. The largest exhibition so far devoted to the Birmingham-born photographer whose documentation of his own dysfunctional family in the book Ray's a Laugh earned him instant fame and notoriety when it was published in 1996. Until July 16 (Tue-Sat 11am-6pm).

Barber Institute, Birmingham University 0121 414 7333: Masterpiece Loan: Peace and Plenty Binding the Arrows of War by Abraham Janssen. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Picture of the Week
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.