Theology Student Sues State over Scholarship Revocation

By Billups, Andrea | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), June 27, 2000 | Go to article overview

Theology Student Sues State over Scholarship Revocation


Billups, Andrea, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Spokane student Joshua Davey is determined to become a minister.

A high school valedictorian who made perfect grades, Mr. Davey, now 19, earned a badly needed, state-funded scholarship to the state of Washington's Northwest College, a small private school in Kirkland, affiliated with the Assemblies of God.

Shortly after Mr. Davey started freshman classes last fall, state education officials withdrew his financial-aid award, saying his decision to major in religion violates a new policy under the state constitution's mandate of separation of church and state.

Mr. Davey, who was forced to work 25 hours per week clearing tables in a local restaurant to pay for his full-time course load, has since filed a lawsuit, charging that the state has been heavy-handed in applying the establishment clause, discriminating against religion and trampling on his federal rights.

"Does the state of Washington's Constitution trump the national Constitution, which protects religious speech? I think it's pretty obvious that it does not," argues attorney Kevin Theriot of the American Center for Law and Justice, a public-interest law firm that has taken up Mr. Davey's case.

"The state is free to provide for greater separation of church and state, as long as that doesn't infringe upon rights ensured by the federal Constitution, like free speech and the right to free exercise of religion," Mr. Theriot said.

Carolyn Busch, executive policy adviser to Washington Gov. Gary Locke, acknowledges that her state's constitution "has a very strict separation of church and state," particularly in its education system.

Mr. Davey, she adds, was an exemplary student who qualified for and earned the state's Promise Scholarship, a new program for high-achieving, low-income students developed by Mr. Locke. State education officials, she said, were simply upholding the state's constitution when they revoked the scholarship, something they are bound to do.

"It was simply a matter of his choice of degree that excluded him from eligibility for state financial aid," she said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Theology Student Sues State over Scholarship Revocation
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.