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By Swiercz, Paul M. | Human Resource Planning, March 2000 | Go to article overview

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Swiercz, Paul M., Human Resource Planning


What is the top concern of HR leaders today? Recruiting! At least it appears that way to me. I can't seem to get through a conversation without hearing the phrase "the war for talent." While popular and catchy, most of us will agree the war metaphor is hyperbolic. In truth, the top concern is about talent acquisition. It's about issues that have always been key responsibilities of HRPS members: planning, securing, developing, and keeping talented people in the organization. It's not about winning a war, it's about doing our job.

In this issue we have an opportunity to reflect upon the talent acquisition and retention process absent the clamorous and distracting image of war. Daniel Feldman, a distinguished professor at the University of South Carolina, and his co-author Seongsu Kim, on the faculty at Seoul National University, have written "Bridge Employment During Retirement: A Field Study of Individual and Organizational Experiences with Post-Retirement Employment." In this era of 30-something Internet millionaires, it is easy to forget that most of us have careers that develop over a lifetime. Careers that too often play themselves out in organizations where policies designed to facilitate the transition from worker to retiree are still woefully underdeveloped. This article makes a significant contribution to our understanding of that transition phase and reminds us that organizational exit is no less important than organizational entry.

The article "Strengthening Human Resource Strategies: Insights from the Experiences of Midcareer Professional Women" by Karen S. Whelan-Berry of Samford University and Judith R. Gordon of Boston College gives a more measured view of the employment experience. …

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