Mom Hopes Guilty Verdict in Abduction Saves Others

By Kazak, David R. | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), June 14, 2000 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Mom Hopes Guilty Verdict in Abduction Saves Others


Kazak, David R., Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Joyce Tardio finally has hope that the promise she made to her daughter won't be broken again.

It was a promise made at the grave of 15-year-old Julie Angel shortly after her killer, Robert Koppa, was sent away in 1980 for the next 30 years.

Tardio vowed that Koppa would never hurt another person again.

But when Koppa was released just 15 years later, it took just 17 months before he did hurt again. In 1996, he abducted a Bloomingdale teen from a Woodfield Shopping Center parking lot and sexually abused her.

On Tuesday, Cook County Judge Joseph Urso found Koppa, 51, of Palatine Township, guilty on eight counts of aggravated criminal sexual abuse, aggravated kidnapping and armed violence. He's facing a punishment that could keep him locked away for much of the rest of his life.

"It's about time," said Tardio, who's been following the case as closely as the victim's family. She broke down in tears and hugged the victim's family members after Urso issued his verdict.

Urso rejected the defense claim that Koppa was insane, telling the court he believed the expert medical and psychological witnesses who testified for Koppa were wrong.

Psychiatrist Henry Lahmeyer had testified that undocumented brain injuries - attested to by neuropsychologist Christopher Randolph - had caused Koppa to lose his inhibitions, causing him to suffer from an impulse disorder.

Lahmeyer said Koppa couldn't control his actions, one of the standards defense attorneys had to prove in order to convince Urso that Koppa was insane.

But Lahmeyer was "successfully rebutted," Urso said, by psychiatrist Matthew Markos, who testified for the prosecution.

Markos said Koppa showed no evidence of any disorders that would have affected his ability to know right from wrong, or which would have prevented him from controlling his actions.

Impulse control disorders, Markos testified, would have been marked by a swiftness not seen in Koppa's actions on that July day when he abducted his victim.

After kidnapping the 17-year-old - who'd just completed a work shift at one of the shopping center stores - Koppa drove her in his car to a wooded and isolated area of Wauconda, where he forced her to disrobe and wear formal dresses.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Mom Hopes Guilty Verdict in Abduction Saves Others
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.