The Japanese Look at U.S. Real Estate

Management Review, January 1988 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

The Japanese Look at U.S. Real Estate


THE JAPANESE LOOK AT U.S. REAL ESTATE

A group of Japanese real estate executives, touring the United States to research its residential real estate business, found the impact of dual-income couples on the housing market to be the most significant difference between the real estate business in Japan and the U.S., according to Merrill Lynch Realty's Relocation Management Division (MLRM).

The group of nine real estate executives, who met with industry experts in Washington, D.C., Los Angeles, and San Francisco, explained that American companies wishing to relocate managers must address issues that do not arise in Japan. For instance, Japanese families usually do not move when the father is relocated. Instead, relocated executives move to the new city alone and live in company-owned, dormitory-style housing. The company then pays its employees expenses to return home and visit their families for two weekends per month.

Another difference in housing needs is that many Japanese howeowners obtain mortgages from the husband's employer at interest rates of about 2 to 3 percent, well below rates offered by traditional lending institutions. Therefore, Japanese families do not "trade up" their homes every few years as many Americans do, because of the difficulty in finding comparable housing and financing.

The biggest difference in home purchases between Japan and the U.S., according to the visitors, is the role a wife's income can play in buying a home. In Japan, a second income is rarely a factor because there are still relatively few working wives and mothers. In the U.S., dual-income couples are a significant segment of those buying homes.

For many American couples two incomes are essential to purchasing a home, according to Joseph Sassano, MLRM's vice-president of marketing.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

The Japanese Look at U.S. Real Estate
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?