Health: Too Much of a Good Thing; You Don't Need Us to Tell You That Exercise, Low-Fat Diets, Fibre, Vitamins, Sex and Sleep Are Good for You. but You Do Need Us to Tell You That Too Much of Any of Them Is Bad for You. Michele Kirsch Reports

By Kirsch, Michele | The Mirror (London, England), July 18, 2000 | Go to article overview

Health: Too Much of a Good Thing; You Don't Need Us to Tell You That Exercise, Low-Fat Diets, Fibre, Vitamins, Sex and Sleep Are Good for You. but You Do Need Us to Tell You That Too Much of Any of Them Is Bad for You. Michele Kirsch Reports


Kirsch, Michele, The Mirror (London, England)


WORKOUT MANIA

Do you go to the gym for three hours a day, seven days a week? No, we thought not, but just in case you're ever in danger of compulsive over- exercising, it's good to know your limits. Lorna Malcolm, studio coordinator for Esporta Health & Racquet Clubs, says, `Although regular exercise has many benefits, too much of it can lead to permanent or recurring injury, dramatic weight loss, and a sharp decrease in energy levels. In order to improve your fitness, you should aim to do 20 to 30 minutes of moderate activity each day, working up to an hour.'

How much is too much? `If someone experiences a feeling of anxiety when not exercising, they are overdoing it,' says Lorna. Signs to look out for are lethargy, mood swings and depression.

FAT PHOBIA

Having fish and chips with a deep-fried Mars bar for pudding every day is never a good idea, but drastically reducing your fat intake can be counterproductive. Patrick Holford, founder of the Institute of Optimum Nutrition, and author of The 30 Day Fat Burner Diet (pounds 6.99, Piatkus), says there are two problems with very low-fat diets. `Firstly, such regimes are high in carbohydrates. Sugar and refined foods replace fatty foods. This encourages blood sugar problems which can cause fatigue, mood swings and sugar cravings. A more serious aspect of low-fat diets is the exclusion of sufficient essential fats. Without these, the body can't function properly.' Studies show that for this reason, people on very low-fat diets experience low energy, yeast problems and, again, mood swings. Holford says we should eat more foods rich in essential fats (also called omega-3 and omega-6 fats), including seeds, seed oils and fish.

How low is too low? About 20% of your total calorie intake should come from fats. Patrick Holford says of that 20%, the ideal breakdown would be: 4% omega-6 fats and 3% omega-3, 7% monosaturated fats like olive oil and no more than 6% saturated fats (butter and cream). Signs of a deficiency of essential fats include dry skin, eczema, brittle nails and poor hair condition.

FIBRE OVERLOAD

Ever notice how, in second-hand book shops, next to the eight copies of Jaws, there are always three copies of The F Plan Diet, which had slimmers the world over scoffing tablespoons of bran at every opportunity. Dietary fibre, as found in fruit and vegtables, is a good thing, but taking wheat bran has no proven effect on weight loss. Worse, it can aggravate IBS, wind and bloating. Nutritionist Suzannah Olivier, author of Banish Bloating (pounds 6.99, Pocket Books), says that wheat bran is also high in phytates, which bind calcium, magnesium, zinc and iron, and can significantly reduce their absorption.

How much is too much? …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Health: Too Much of a Good Thing; You Don't Need Us to Tell You That Exercise, Low-Fat Diets, Fibre, Vitamins, Sex and Sleep Are Good for You. but You Do Need Us to Tell You That Too Much of Any of Them Is Bad for You. Michele Kirsch Reports
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.